Author Topic: The Resurrection of Moby Brick  (Read 8555 times)

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« on: December 04, 2017, 01:35:45 PM »
In the month following the accident, I've been stripping the bike and shopping for replacement parts.  I've been really lucky in that nearly all the stuff I need is on the net for very good prices.  So far, I have been able to get nearly everything I need for a complete restoration and I'm about $100 under budget fror the parts I have bought.  I need to give a big thank you to all the guys stripping bricks to make cafe bikes.

The bike must have rolled a couple times before coming to rest and destroyed every piece of plastic except for the front mudguard.  The swing arm, rear end of the frame, shock, seat and tank were destroyed.

I gotten some pretty good deals so far, like $50 shipped for a good fuel tank and $450 shipped for a complete K1100RS fairing with mirrors, headlight, all mounting parts, turn signals and belly pan.  Got an R11RT rear wheel for $70 shipped and a set of city cases in almost new condition for $90 shipped.

I've been able to do a little work now that I can move around again, and have cleaned and painted the new rear wheel, swing arm, and final drive.  Next in line is the crankcase and valve covers as well as the brake calipers.  Hope to get to them later this week.

Checking the electrical system, the starter, instrument cluster, brake switches, and fuel pump all work properly.  Can't test the turns signals right now, but I am pretty sure that when I replace the signals they'll work. 

The "new" frame is in the mail and should be here later this week
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Martin

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2017, 01:53:35 PM »
That was one big hit Gryph, how did The Honourable Senator for Finance and Recreation take it? Also how are you going to fit four Bricks in the garage, does this mean buying a car cover? Good to see you are picking up parts at a good price, hope the rebuild goes well.
Regards Martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2017, 08:00:11 PM »
Martin, when it's finished, the plan is to ride it a bit to shake out any rough spots, and then put it up for sale.  Not planning on making much on it, mainly it's something to keep me occupied over the interminable winter, and to keep a nice bike alive.

Went out to the garage this afternoon and found that the FedEx guy had been there.  Looks pretty good, very little rust, not even around the rear loop under the tail cowl where there usually is a lot.  One little problem though, the seller did not include the title.  Hope they didn't lose it.  email sent and am waiting for a reply. 

 Meanwhile, today I pulled the valve cover and spark plugs.  Bike had been laying on the left side for almost three weeks and would not turn over because of oil getting into cylinder four and causing a hydraulic lock.  With the plugs out I was able to turn the engine over and blow the oil out.  Spins nicely now. 

A clean up and a paint job on the valve cover and it's ready to go.  Next is the crank case cover.  Probably won't get to it until Wednesday. 
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Martin

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2017, 08:56:16 PM »
Don't you just love it when a plan comes together. I presume you will be painting it white? :popcorm
Regards Martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2017, 12:07:21 PM »
The past couple weeks I've been searching for the last of the parts I need, Tank, bars, heated grips.  I've decided to keep the Moby Brick.  Had some issues with the seller of the replacement and the deal fell through.

Got a set of heated grips real cheap because the right one didn't work.  Pulled the grip off and immediately saw the burned out wire.  15 minutes with a soldering iron and it's good as new.

Frame was pretty dirty, but showed hardly any rust.  Took it to the car wash with degreaser, and once it was cleaned it shows hardly any paint damage or rust.  Not quite new, but close enough for me.  Still, I'm going to do a little touch up here and there with POR 15.

Got a tank almost for free when I figured the shipping.  Got it cheap because it had a dent that looked like someone whacked it with an axe.  Lucky for me, the dent wasn't in the spot where the double wall was.  I was able to tap out most of it with a rod and a hammer through the hole for the level sensor.  A bit of DuraGlass and it will pass even close inspection.

Was going to do the bike white again, but seeing the Special Ed paint job, going with it is a no brainer.  I'll have the only RS with an 1100RS fairing and the Special Ed paint job. 

The rest of the fairing parts are 600 grit wet sanded and ready for primer and glaze.  Parts won't need much.  They are in really good shape.  I probably would have used them as I got them if they were any color but black.  I hate the way black bikes always look dirty.  It's bad enough I'll have all that dark blue in the paint job.

Transmission gear switch got messed up in the crash.  I pulled it off, cleaned up the insides and reinstalled it with stainless allen screws after wrapping it with self amalgamating rubber tape to keep  the water out.  The allen screws are a nice touch if you have ever tried to get the hex head screws out.  There isn't enough clearance to get a socket on the head.  It's an ugly place down there, so the stainless will be nice.

Handlebars were a ittle rusty so I stripped them with a wire wheel.  Going to do them with POR 15 along with the frame and the centerstand.  I need to rework them for the grip wiring. 

Man!  All this stuff takes up a lot of room.  I can hardly move in my shop.  It will be great when I get the frame done and I can start putting all this stuff together.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline riots100

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  • Posts: 147
Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2017, 12:55:59 PM »
Forgive my ignorance, but there are some acronyms/phrasing that I'm not familiar with and cannot infer meaning based on context: POR 15, Special Ed Paint Job, DuraGlass?


Looking forward to seeing how this one turns out!
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • 1992 K75, 2007 K1200GT, 1991 K100RS
----
BDJ

Offline propav8r

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  • Posts: 126
Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2017, 01:21:28 PM »
Forgive my ignorance, but there are some acronyms/phrasing that I'm not familiar with and cannot infer meaning based on context: POR 15, Special Ed Paint Job, DuraGlass?


Looking forward to seeing how this one turns out!


POR15 is a very tough rust converter/paint. DuraGlass is fiberglass-impregnated body filler. I think the Special Ed paint job is another forum member's custom paint. Not sure there.


Good luck Gryph, and thanks for the parts!
  • Franklin, NC
  • 1985 K100RS, 1978 GL1000, 1972 Kawasaki H2 750

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2017, 01:53:49 PM »
In the late 80's the K100RS came with a special edition blue and white paint job.  My new tank came off of one of those bikes.  They were designated as K100RS SE for special edition.

I kinda like the abbreviation Special Ed as much as I like the paint scheme. 

POR 15(Paint Over Rust) was recommended to me by a friend who restores old British cars so I thought I'd try it on the frame and handlebars.  It's supposed to be super tough so I am hoping it won't chip on the centerstand.

I used a lot of DuroGlass when I worked in a boatyard.  It's better than Bondo because it's a lot stronger, and more waterproof.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2017, 11:16:37 PM »
Have got a little bit more done in the past week or so inspite of the holidays.

The frame and handlebars have two coats of Paint Over Rust and a satin black top coat.  While the paint was drying, I prepped a few more parts of the fairing.  The "new" fairing's air deflector and windshield had broken tabs that needed to be repaired.  Cyanoacrylate glue worked well on the windshield tab and it was reinforced with a small screw on the deflector. 

I've also been cleaning and otherwise prepping and restoring every part that will be used.  I have a spray bottle of POR 15 Cleaner/Degreaser that is amazing at stripping the dirt and grease off of everything you spray it on.  I use it to prep the fairing parts for wet sanding with 600 grit and cleaning everything that isn't going to get painted.  It's super easy to use, just a quick spray, and wipe with a sponge followed by a good rinse.  If the grease was really thick is might take a second shot.  I work in the laundry tubs since it's too cold to go outside.  I can do six or seven parts completely in about ten minutes.  Nothing goes on the bike if it isn't cleaned first.

Got the frame off the engine a few days ago.  Since then, the weather has gotten brutally cold and the garage was in the 10F temperature range which is too cold for even my heaters.  Instead of working outside, I set up shop in the family room to get the harness cleaned up by removing the ABS wiring a rewrapping the wire bundles with new friction tape.

I also took all the switches and sub cables down to the laundry for a good clean.  After an overnight dry I cleaned all the connectors and accessible switch contacts with DeoxIt.  With the frame on the family room coffee table I started installing the main harness and and assembling a few things like the seat lock and the lower part of the tail cowl.  I also went through the fasteners for a lot of parts and replaced them with stainless from my stainless stash.

With the frame ready to put on the engine I cleaned up the rear mudguard, and the radiator.  With only 14,000 miles since I last cleaned out the fins I was amazed at how much dirt came out of them.

Took the forks off the old frame and cleaned up the top bearing.  In the super cold garage the grease had hardened to the point where the forks could hardly be turned.  I had to use a heat gun to warm the grease enough to be able to clean it out.  Considering how everything else on the bike got bent and twisted in the crash I am really surprised and glad that the forks and triple clamps survived unscathed.  Tomorrow I'll have to bring them in to get the grease out of the lower bearing, then they'll be ready to reinstall once the frame is put on the engine. 

Next thing is to clean up the engine a little and removing the crank cover so I can paint it.  With the cold in the garage I'm not sure when that will happen. 
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Martin

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2017, 02:22:48 AM »
Looking good Gryph.  :popcorm
Regards Martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline Filmcamera

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  • Posts: 1294
Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2017, 07:11:31 AM »
Looks great  :clap:
  • San Jose, Costa Rica
  • 1991 K100RS 16v ABS1, 2018 Triumph Street Triple RS 765
Poserbricker

Offline Barry in IN

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  • Posts: 177
Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2017, 07:22:26 AM »
I've enjoyed following this.  I started browsing around here about the time the wreck happened.   At that time I was looking at a K100RS that needed reassembled from the only worse fate (cafe conversion attempt).  I passed/missed out on my deal but when you started saving Moby, I got to watch a similar job being done.  It is easier watching, but it may make me try to save another one yet. 

I'm just glad you're saving a motorcycle. 
  • Indiana
  • 1992 K75S Lili Von Shtuppe
A pox on cafe “builders”

Offline billday

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2017, 09:15:24 AM »
Considering how everything else on the bike got bent and twisted in the crash I am really surprised and glad that the forks and triple clamps survived unscathed. 

You were smart, getting rear-ended instead of running into something yourself. I'll try to remember that.
  • New York State, USA 10977
  • 1985 K100

Offline Laitch

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2017, 03:36:24 PM »
. . . I'll try to remember that.
Another example of Motobrick.com discussions stimulating lifelong learning in its membership.  :2thumbup:
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75T 68,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2017, 03:26:41 PM »
Have a little more done now, despite the deep freeze in the garage.  Swapped the rear tire from the old wheel onto the new wheel.  Before installing the tire I checked the wheels balance without a tire.  Found the heavy spot was about 6" away from the valve stem which is the traditional heavy spot.  Wheel was a hair over 1 ounce heavy there.

Installed the tire and found that the wheel was still heavy at the same spot by the a bit over 1 1/2 ounces.  Looks like the wheel is more out of balance than the tire!?

Got the crankshaft cover off and out of the cold.  It looks like a good portion of the sliding the bike did was on the cover.  Lots of scratches and a couple deep gouges, but otherwise solid and not leaking any oil.

Spent the afternoon cleaning, and sanding the cover.  Then a skim coat of filler sanded with 220 to fill in the scratches and gouges.  A shot of high build primer and wet sand with 600 followed by three coats of black base coat and four coats of satin clear coat.  The black took a while because of all the masking for the raw aluminum stripes and the logo. 

The results were worth the effort, except for the realization that at least 3/4 of the cover is hidden by the fairing.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Filmcamera

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2017, 03:29:43 PM »
That looks really good, I keep thinking about doing mine then have the same thought you did - it is nearly totally hidden by the fairing.  Still it nags away at me so I am sure I will give up and do it one day... I will know it looks great under there at least!
  • San Jose, Costa Rica
  • 1991 K100RS 16v ABS1, 2018 Triumph Street Triple RS 765
Poserbricker

Offline jakgieger

  • itinerant farmer
  • ^ SuperNatural Motobricker
  • Posts: 557
Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2017, 06:23:44 PM »
Outta control Gryph :bmwsmile an SE with 1100 fairing!...I am jealous already, and then the city cases for 90.  Where do you find these things????
  • Kansas USA
  • 1989 K100rs se
"What we've got here is failure, to communicate.  Some men, you just cain't reach.  So you get what we had here last week.  Which is the way he wants it...Well, he gets it.  I don't like it any more than you men do."

Offline alabrew

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  • Posts: 102
Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2018, 03:46:18 PM »
I am jealous already, and then the city cases for 90.  Where do you find these things????


I was wondering the same thing! Been really wanting a set, just not at the $500+ I had seen (once)
  • Alabama
  • 1985 K100, 1991 K100RS
Also:
2005 K1200LT
1979 R65
200,000 miles on BMW motorcycles

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2018, 04:42:15 PM »
I spend around 10 minutes in the morning with my coffee checking new listings on eBay.  Good deals come up, but they disappear quickly when guys like me jump on them.

I have to admit I've been blessed getting the parts for Moby Brick.  To find a complete fairing with good mirrors, turn signals and all the mounting brackets along with the airflow deflector is a once in a lifetime thing, especially at the price I got it for. 

About the city cases.  I did a part search at Max BMW and found that they were used on several other models.  One of the models was the F650GS, so I started searching BMW F650 saddle bags and tragkorbs.  The first time I searched I found them.  Apparantly the guys who ride those bikes are into aluminum tragkorbs so when they upgrade their bike they just want to get rid of the plastic cases that came with it.  Apparantly the guy who sold me mine didn't realize how cherished they are by other BMW riders. 

The tank was a good buy because it had a 3/4" deep dent just above where your knee is, right on the curve of the tank.  Most guys don't want dented tanks, so the prices run pretty low.  I got really lucky in that the dent was not in a double walled part of the tank, and was accessible through the hole for the fuel sender.  I was able to get the dent 90% pushed out in an hour or so of working on it which was pretty easy to finish with a little bit of filler.

Nearly everything I get on eBay has a problem.  By being willing and able to make repairs means I can take a chance on really cheap parts.  I've been burned a couple times like the instrument cluster that was totally destroyed inside by water, but normally I can make the part work. 

I've been buying stuff on eBay for years, and have learned a few tricks like misspelling the name of a manufacturer or item.  A wife or mother selling off a divorced husband's or adult kid's stuff can be a source of fantastic deals.  To find them though you have to have a feel for what a clueless person is going to call things or misspell names.  I'm a drummer and in the past used to buy and sell Ziljun simbols(actually Zildjian cymbals).  Anyone who can't spell the name usually doesn't know what they're selling is worth. 

The deals are out there, you just have to be persistant and become knowledgeable on the different models that use a part you're interested in.  BMW is good in that so many of their parts are used for long periods of time on a lot of different models.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2018, 12:48:09 PM »
With outside daily high temperatures stuck around 0F to +5F the garage is hard to work in more than an hour or two at a time.  Nonetheless, I have been able to get a little more done out there.

I pulled the lower airbox off and cleaned out 25 years of oily sludge as well as cleaning the road dirt off the top of the block under the airbox.  It was a really good time to remove the engine temperature sender and check it out.  Got it cleaned up, Deoxed the terminals and reinstalled the riser with stainless screws.  It was good to see how squeaky clean the internal cooling passages were after how caked up they were with mineral deposits when I got the bike. 

With the frame off, it was a good time to service the non-functional "choke" switch.  It hadn't been working for all of last year.  It certainly wasn't critical, but since I will ride for an hour before I notice I left the choke on, the light is a good reminder.  Shot some DeoxIt in it and worked it a bit until the switch functioned again.  Worked some silicone grease into the plunger then reinstalled it on the throttle bodies and confirmed proper operation.  Joy...

Another task I got to was to check the breather hose plumbing on the throttle bodies where it's hidden by the air box.  Because I have a good spare the plumbing is in great shape and will probably last forever.  I did have a loose hose clamp on one of the connections that I was able to correct with a new clamp. 

I cleaned up the boots for the clutch and the transmission output shaft.  As usual, it took me about an hour to get the boot attached to the swingarm.  The connector for the sidestand switch broke off the cable.  Found a "new" one on eBay and it should be here in a day or two.

Next was to install the swing arm and final drive.  The drive shaft survived the assault and got cleaned well of the grit and dirt that got scooped up into the broken swing arm as the bike was skidding along the side of the road.  Lubed the splines and confirmed that the u-joints worked smoothly through their full range.  No slop or stickiness.  More joy...

I assembled the swing arm and final drive after cleaning and lubing the bearings.  With the swing arm in place, I can now see where I can install a grease fitting in the clutch arm shaft.  With the temperatures in the garage running in the mid teens, laying on the floor to drill for the fitting will have to wait until Monday when the temperature is forecast to actually be above freezing for the afternoon.

With the rear wheel installed I tried to spin it in neutral to be sure that all was well in the drive train.  Holy Mackeral!  With the transmission and final drive lubes at 15F degrees that wheel was a bear to turn.

Looks like the drive train is ready to have the frame installed, but I'll wait until the weather gets a little bit warmer.  In the meantime, I think I'll amuse myself with a little more prep work on the fairing and handlebars. 
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Martin

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2018, 01:11:17 PM »
Gryph it's better if you remove the clutch arm to drill and tap it, as you can then deburr the hole on the inside. Plus you are not drilling into the shaft.
Regards Martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2018, 01:54:06 PM »
Martin, I've thought about that, but taking everything apart is a royal PIA.  The clips are corroded and almost impossible to get at.  I'm inclined to let sleeping dogs lie on that part of the job.  Fortunately, right now the arm moves easily on the shaft.

Drilling the aluminum casting isn't such a big deal and the minor burr that is left at the break-thru point won't be a problem when the cavity is full of grease.  No danger with damaging the shaft, it's easy to feel when the bit breaks through into the cavity for the shaft. 

I'm using drive-in fittings that don't require threading the hole, just tap them into the properly sized hole(I have a dedicated drill bit for them).  Makes installing them a 10  minute job.

The nice thing about doing it in place is that if you can get the drill in there, getting the grease gun on the fitting will be easy too.

This is how I have done the other two bikes, and have had no problems with them. 
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Martin

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2018, 04:20:25 PM »
 :2thumbup: Ahh another advantage of living in paradise no snow= no salt = no corrosion= no pain. :clap:
Regards Martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2018, 09:32:20 PM »
Just spent an hour writing up a blow by blow of the installation of the frame and checking the alternator brushes, but because one of the photo files was too big the whole thing has been trashed. 

Here's all i'm posting: I put the frame on the engine and hooked up the wiring and radiator.   

The alternator brushes were worn out.  Ordered new and they will be here in a few days.  No problem to install them while the alternator is in place as long as I haven't installed the battery.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline rbm

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Re: The Resurrection of Moby Brick
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2018, 11:18:40 PM »
That's happened enough times to me that, if I'm composing a large posting, I always copy-paste the text into Notepad before hitting the enter button.  That way, I can recall my work if something goes wrong.  If all OK, I just discard the Notepad.
  • Regards, Robert
Toronto, Ontario

1987 K75 - Build Blog @http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/

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