Author Topic: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS  (Read 76922 times)

Offline MaraudeRS

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The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« on: October 31, 2016, 07:47:49 PM »
Hello all! Not only is this my first project but it's the first bike I've ever owned. It was given to me by a friend who got it from his neighbor. It's been sitting for at least 10 years so it has rust and corrosion everywhere. It appears to be mostly on the surface so I'm hoping it won't be a big deal to clean/fix. It has 41k miles but I'm told these bikes will go for a lot longer than that. When I received it it wouldn't even start so I pulled the battery and tested it...it was dead. From reading this forum I learned about the Odyssey pc680 so that what I ordered for it. Once I got the new battery in I was able to get it to fire up and even idle. I didn't want to run it too long as it still had all the fluids in it from when I received it. Also from reading on here, I'll be doing all this
I'm going to have a lot of questions, specifically, what to get and where to get it. I don't mind using the search function so of course I'll resort to that first.

So without further ado, here she is:

And without her baggage:



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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline Martin

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2016, 08:14:16 PM »
Welcome to the asylum from the land of OZ. First thing is either down load or get a workshop manual you will find it invaluable.
Regards Martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline mystic red

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2016, 08:25:21 PM »
Welcome, that's a good lookin project! If it has been sitting for 10 years replace the tires no matter what they look like.

Offline MaraudeRS

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2016, 08:39:06 PM »
Welcome to the asylum from the land of OZ. First thing is either down load or get a workshop manual you will find it invaluable.
Regards Martin.

Thanks, Martin! I'm very excited. The bike did come with this Haynes book. It should be good, right?


Welcome, that's a good lookin project! If it has been sitting for 10 years replace the tires no matter what they look like.

Thanks! I'm definitely going to replace the tires. That's one of the things I was going to ask advice on. What are the "go-to" tires for these beasts?


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline Martin

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2016, 08:46:08 PM »
 :2thumbup:
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline mystic red

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Online The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2016, 09:01:12 PM »
Of the several manuals available, I would say the Haynes is definitely not the best.  Get a Clymer Manual, and download a factory manual(they are posted on the internet).  The factory manual is for earlier models, but there is a lot that is common between them.

There are also excellent videos on YouTube most notably by an excellent mechanic with a rather foul mouth named Chris Harris.  Lots of excellent info peppered with F-bombs in his videos.

It's great that you have it running.  With a bike like yours that has sat idle for a long time that is about half or more of the battle.  Check the tank ASAP, and if it's clean, dump some Techron Fuel System Cleaner in it and Start a regime of starting and letting it idle for 5 minutes everyday until you have all the maintenance checks done and she is ready to get out on the road.  Be aware that it will probably run crappy for the first couple thousand miles.  They seem to take that long to get all the cobwebs blown out.

Once you have it running on the road, you can strip the bodywork and clean up the corrosion and do some repainting.  The rear frame tube under the seat and cowl will be really bad, probably the worst part of the frame.  Take your time, you have a really great bike there that will give you many years and at least 100,000 miles of pleasure.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue, '89 K100RS Special edition White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too
'89 K100RS SE

Offline bocutter Ed

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2016, 09:14:33 PM »
The bike did come with this Haynes book.
Just note that the manual is 5 years older than your '92 ...
  • Toronto, Canada
  • '61 Puch DS60 - '66 Puch 250 SGS - '87 BMW K75s

Offline F14CRAZY

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2016, 09:48:04 PM »
Why pay for or use a service manual when there's Motobrick?
  • Grand Rapids, MI
  • '87 K75C
'87 K75C w/ Pichler V1 fairing. LED's, CATZ driving lights, Audiovox cruise, LT top case, tons of other mods by Drake...


Online billday

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2016, 07:44:32 AM »
First bike? Consider getting something smaller to learn on while you get that beautiful brick back on the road.
  • New York State, USA 10977
  • 1985 K100

Online The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2016, 09:31:00 AM »
First bike? Consider getting something smaller to learn on while you get that beautiful brick back on the road.

Not a bad idea. 

I rode and raced motorcycles for 20 years and when I got my k75 after 12 years away I dropped it in my driveway the fourth time I took it out. 

Be aware that these bikes are intended for the open road, and are heavy and a bit clumsy at slow speeds in tight situations, especially if you are less than about 5' 9".  Your RS isn't as top heavy as an RT, but it can still be a handful.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue, '89 K100RS Special edition White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too
'89 K100RS SE

Offline MaraudeRS

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2016, 10:13:30 AM »
Of the several manuals available, I would say the Haynes is definitely not the best.  Get a Clymer Manual, and download a factory manual(they are posted on the internet).  The factory manual is for earlier models, but there is a lot that is common between them.

There are also excellent videos on YouTube most notably by an excellent mechanic with a rather foul mouth named Chris Harris.  Lots of excellent info peppered with F-bombs in his videos.

It's great that you have it running.  With a bike like yours that has sat idle for a long time that is about half or more of the battle.  Check the tank ASAP, and if it's clean, dump some Techron Fuel System Cleaner in it and Start a regime of starting and letting it idle for 5 minutes everyday until you have all the maintenance checks done and she is ready to get out on the road.  Be aware that it will probably run crappy for the first couple thousand miles.  They seem to take that long to get all the cobwebs blown out.

Once you have it running on the road, you can strip the bodywork and clean up the corrosion and do some repainting.  The rear frame tube under the seat and cowl will be really bad, probably the worst part of the frame.  Take your time, you have a really great bike there that will give you many years and at least 100,000 miles of pleasure.

Thanks! I'll definitely get the factory manual because, to be honest, I don't know what all the switches do. Most of the wording that may have been on them is gone. I'm glad to hear that I should get 100k miles out of this thing because I'm a little worried about how much money it's going to take to get this thing done compared to what buying one in good condition would cost.

Just note that the manual is 5 years older than your '92 ...
True that. I'm sure there are some similarities but also plenty of changes over those 5 years.
Why pay for or use a service manual when there's Motobrick?

My thoughts exactly! :) But I also don't want to be a nuisance and ask stupid questions that could easily be answered by checking a manual. I'd rather save your guys' time for stuff like "what tires do you guys recommend" or "what would be a good after-market exhaust to put on it".

First bike? Consider getting something smaller to learn on while you get that beautiful brick back on the road.
Not a bad idea. 

I rode and raced motorcycles for 20 years and when I got my k75 after 12 years away I dropped it in my driveway the fourth time I took it out. 

Be aware that these bikes are intended for the open road, and are heavy and a bit clumsy at slow speeds in tight situations, especially if you are less than about 5' 9".  Your RS isn't as top heavy as an RT, but it can still be a handful.

Although I completely agree with you, it was hard enough getting my wife on-board with letting me get a bike that doesn't even run, let alone trying to convince her to let me get a second one! My plan is to get comfortable and confident riding it before I do any repairs/mods that would get damaged by my dropping it.


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline riots100

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2016, 02:31:26 PM »
I haven't had to drop a lot of money bringing my brick back from years of non-use.  The trade off of course, is sweat equity.  If would have had to pay someone to do what I did, it would have cost much more.

Since the bike was given to you, take the cost of what a decent k100 of similar make and milage would cost used and use that figure for your budget for parts and repairs.  (the time you give is for the love of the game)
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • 1992 K75, 2007 K1200GT, 1991 K100RS
----
BDJ

Online The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2016, 06:19:09 PM »
Do your own work as much as possible.  Don't think of it as sweat equity, that sounds too much like work.  Personally, I look at working on my toys as foreplay.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue, '89 K100RS Special edition White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too
'89 K100RS SE

Offline MaraudeRS

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2016, 07:15:13 PM »
I haven't had to drop a lot of money bringing my brick back from years of non-use.  The trade off of course, is sweat equity.  If would have had to pay someone to do what I did, it would have cost much more.

Since the bike was given to you, take the cost of what a decent k100 of similar make and milage would cost used and use that figure for your budget for parts and repairs.  (the time you give is for the love of the game)
This is exactly the mentality I have going into it. It already has sentimental value being that it's my first bike and was given to me by a good friend that's moving away. I already know that I'll be putting more money into it than what it's worth since I'll be having the frame and other parts professionally cleaned and repainted but I'm ok with that.

I just left Walmart with 15w-50 Mobil 1 motor oil, 75w-90 trans & gear oil, a Bosch d3330 oil filter, & dot4 brake fluid. I was at autozone earlier and got the Techron fuel system cleaner and some Armorall leather restorer for the seat.

I have a mechanically inclined neighbor that's always fixing BMW cars and he offered to help me out. That'll be very helpful to a noob like me.


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline MaraudeRS

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2016, 07:22:58 PM »
Do your own work as much as possible.  Don't think of it as sweat equity, that sounds too much like work.  Personally, I look at working on my toys as foreplay.
Exactly! For me it'll be therapy


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline MaraudeRS

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2016, 01:44:42 PM »
After searching this forum and talking to a friend of mine that has ridden for years, I think I'll be getting a set of the Pirelli Angel GT tires for Rusty Brick. I really wanted a set of Shinko tires but it doesn't look like they make a rear tire in my size, 160/60zr18. Has anyone tried a wider tire on their stock rear wheel? It's purely for aesthetics, of course, but I love the look of a wide rear tire.


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline racket

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2016, 01:58:04 PM »
After searching this forum and talking to a friend of mine that has ridden for years, I think I'll be getting a set of the Pirelli Angel GT tires for Rusty Brick. I really wanted a set of Shinko tires but it doesn't look like they make a rear tire in my size, 160/60zr18. Has anyone tried a wider tire on their stock rear wheel? It's purely for aesthetics, of course, but I love the look of a wide rear tire.


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I have a Dunlop 160/60 18. Fits fine, but I don't use the center stand so I'm not if there are clearance issues there (I think there might be).  A few people have fitted the  K1200 rear wheel and have successfully run 170s if you want to try that
  • Philadelphia, PA
  • 1986 BMW K100

Offline MaraudeRS

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The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2016, 08:20:08 PM »
I have a Dunlop 160/60 18. Fits fine, but I don't use the center stand so I'm not if there are clearance issues there (I think there might be).  A few people have fitted the  K1200 rear wheel and have successfully run 170s if you want to try that

A 170 would be cool but I don't want to go through the effort unless I can get at least a 190 on it. I'll just stick with what I've got for now.

On another note, I just ordered 4 NGK Iridium DR7EIX spark plugs. My plan is to replace the engine oil, oil filter, and spark plugs before I run the motor with fresh gas and Techron cleaner. Sound right?


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline MaraudeRS

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2016, 10:37:53 AM »
What stand should I buy for working on the bike? Is there one that you really like and works well for the K100s? I'm going to be moving it into the garage as winter approaches so I want to get a stand that makes it easy to work on the bike.


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  • Monterey, CA
  • 1992 K100RS

Offline blackie1

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  • christchurch nz
Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2016, 03:15:45 AM »
hi
good luck with your project.
you have probably already polished up your seat with that armourall .

if you haven't then my advice is don't. 

sure your seat will look great but the first time you lean a bit on the front brake you are more than likely going to introduce your testicles to the back of your fuel tank at some speed.

i speak from experience and for a while there i spoke a full octave higher.

warm soapy water would be my advice
  • new zealand , where else would u want to live, really
  • 1991 K75RT naked 40,000kms

Offline Brad-Man

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2016, 08:59:48 AM »
I suspect you're gonna have to specify what kinda work to get a recommendation for a stand...

I have a ft so I don't hafta lay on the floor and a motorcycle lift that combined w/angle iron brackets allow me to get wheels off the ground...
  • Marietta, GA
  • '85 K100
Toys don't make the Man - Man makes the Toys...
'74 RD350
'75 RD350 w/Modified 400 engine, Chambers & MZB iggy

Offline Brad-Man

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2016, 08:59:59 AM »
I suspect you're gonna have to specify what kinda work to get a recommendation for a stand...

I have a ft so I don't hafta lay on the floor and a motorcycle lift that combined w/angle iron brackets allow me to get wheels off the ground...
  • Marietta, GA
  • '85 K100
Toys don't make the Man - Man makes the Toys...
'74 RD350
'75 RD350 w/Modified 400 engine, Chambers & MZB iggy

Offline Laitch

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2016, 10:14:38 AM »
Do you have a motorcycle operators license, MaraudeRS?
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
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Offline Laitch

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Re: The Rusty Brick - '92 K100RS
« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2016, 10:37:27 AM »
you have probably already polished up your seat with that armourall .
if you haven't then my advice is don't. 
sure your seat will look great but the first time you lean a bit on the front brake you are more than likely going to introduce your testicles to the back of your fuel tank at some speed.
i speak from experience and for a while there i spoke a full octave higher.
warm soapy water would be my advice
:hehehe :2thumbup:
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
https://tinyurl.com/RillRider

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