Author Topic: Greetings and Questions about K75  (Read 1362 times)

Offline mlytle

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2019, 12:19:06 PM »
+1 for the Seller. Great guy. Bought my K1100RS from him. I believe he has a couple ads up. He was downsizing his fleet when I was visiting/purchasing.

was that the blue k1100 that was on clist for a long time?
  • alexandria, va
  • 92 K75s, 94 K75s, 96 K1100RS SE (custodian), 09 K1300s
Marshall
Project Thread "K75s Midlife Refresh"
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,7810.0.html

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2019, 12:46:37 PM »
the abs has a self test procedure on start up.  start bike, start riding, hit both brakes, the two red lights on dash should go out.

Thanks for that.  Sounds easy enough.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
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Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2019, 01:15:50 PM »
According to Phil Hawksley's site, 29.90 inches is the low seat height.

As far as the T designation goes, don't get tangled in minutiae.

Im surprised at that measurement for the low seat height. I can get an F 750GS with a similar height seat, and thats an adventure bike with quite a bit of ground clearance.   Also, Hawksleys site shows the same low seat height for all models across all years.  Is that correct?

Not getting tangled in minutiae, just curious about his K75 model.  It seems some others are as well.


Slightly over 500lbs with all fluids and ready to ride. The Rebel weighs approximately 330lbs. The Rebel has approximately 16 horsepower; the K75 has around 65 horsepower. Experience, good judgment, coordination, upper body strength and humility would be helpful to have before you climb on one.

Thanks for the weight info. 

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Offline natalena

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2019, 01:18:17 PM »
Good luck on your search for a brick.
I'm also short on the inseam, and found the K75 top-heavy and cumbersome if wearing the flat sole AlpineStars, whereas, wearing the lugged sole work boots is 3/4" of instant confidence at stops. The handlebar is also critical to parking lot slow speeds, and feels much better at a higher setting (K75S) ... even though I prefer being bent over with "strap-ons" ;)
FWIW, I'm across the river from you, Waldorf.
  • East of Joshua Tree
  • 1987 K75s #0919
On Holy Quest seeking Techron equivalent for splines.

Offline E30_Crazy

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2019, 01:26:19 PM »
was that the blue k1100 that was on clist for a long time?

Sounds like it. It was/is blue, and I stalked it a while before pulling the trigger.
  • Newport News, Virginia
  • '85 K100, '93 K1100RS

Online Martin

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2019, 01:50:50 PM »
To solve height problems. As per Nat thicker soled motorcycle boots are available gain 1" +. Shoe lifts gain 1" +. Drop the forks through the trees 10-12 mm. Shave the nose of your OEM seat. Have your seat lowered by a competent upholsterer. Fit the optional 1" lower rear shock, however  your cornering clearance will be reduced. And you will have to shorten your centre stand unless you are super strong.
Regards martin.
  • North Lakes Queensland Australia
  • 1992 K75s Hybrid, Lefaux, Vespa V twin.

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2019, 04:36:35 PM »
Good luck on your search for a brick.
I'm also short on the inseam, and found the K75 top-heavy and cumbersome if wearing the flat sole AlpineStars, whereas, wearing the lugged sole work boots is 3/4" of instant confidence at stops. The handlebar is also critical to parking lot slow speeds, and feels much better at a higher setting (K75S) ... even though I prefer being bent over with "strap-ons" ;)
FWIW, I'm across the river from you, Waldorf.

Your bike is a K75 Sport, correct?  Was that offered with a low-seat option and does yours have it?

As I understand it, on the K75 Standard the original equipment seat is a low seat, not an optional seat choice.   Have you ever compared the height of your Sport bikes seat to the low seat on a Standard?
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Offline natalena

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2019, 07:45:11 PM »
Your bike is a K75 Sport, correct?  Was that offered with a low-seat option and does yours have it?

Yes, it's an "S" with the standard "S" weird, welded bar. I have a comfort seat on mine, it's a great for longer days, and my wife says the pillion is spacious and comfy.

I've test ridden a low seat K, just a short distance. This was a potential buyers ride for 10-15 mins around the neighborhood. It was noticeably easier to flat foot, although I ended up getting the brick with the comfort seat and just slide a cheek to the seat edge if needed in wind or an off-camber road. Once moving there's little to notice in seating, except the low seat option is easier to shift around on.

As far as seat comparison's, it's really odd, but I felt super confident on an XT600 with aftermarket springs and 34" seat height, and never felt secure and solid on a CB750F which is about 31". Riding with dirt riding gear and boots probably had a lot to do with it.
  • East of Joshua Tree
  • 1987 K75s #0919
On Holy Quest seeking Techron equivalent for splines.

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2019, 08:03:42 PM »
I've test ridden a low seat K, just a short distance.  It was noticeably easier to flat foot, although I ended up getting the brick with the comfort seat and just slide a cheek to the seat edge if needed in wind or an off-camber road.
Low comfort seats were also manufactured, come up for sale every once in a while and would fit S models, too.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303
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Offline ScooterNSticks

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2019, 11:13:50 PM »
Slightly over 500lbs with all fluids and ready to ride. The Rebel weighs approximately 330lbs. The Rebel has approximately 16 horsepower; the K75 has around 65 horsepower. Experience, good judgment, coordination, upper body strength and humility would be helpful to have before you climb on one.

While I've ridden a lot of motorcycles over the past 15 years most of my miles have been on a Vespa GTS 250 scooter.  Similar weight to the Rebel.  Six weeks ago I got a 1992 K75 and at Laitch indicates -- the increase in weight demands a few considerations.  That said, I've found the K75 an easy machine to deal with compared with others I've ridden.  Perhaps the biggest challenge for me is learning to be a bit more respectful of the weight when getting on and off the motorcycle.  The scooter is so light that I can throw it around, push it, pull it and get it on the center stand from a lot of awkward positions.  Not so with the K75.  I've had to develop some good habits with both the slow speed maneuvering and the no speed handling.  But otherwise, if you are completely comfortable with the Rebel you'll make the transition ok.

One other thing -- I'm 6'2" so I can easily flatfoot the motorcycle.  That definitely helps.  On the negative side -- at 65 years old I'm not as strong as I once was so I have to be a bit more careful with handling.

Anyway, hope things work out for you.  The K75 is a joy to ride.
  • Boalsburg, PA
  • 1992 BMW K75, 2006 Vespa GTS 250ie
My Blog: Scooter in the Sticks
https://scooterinthesticks.com
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Offline Gibson

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #35 on: September 04, 2019, 09:50:08 AM »
I have a 94 ABS standard model. Bike is a very easy machine compared to my R bike. It is rather heavy though, but this feeling goes away once you get rolling. The handling, ride and cornering are excellent. It especially likes around 5500rpm on highway in 5th. I ride my K75 every day. Good luck in your quest for a nice one. Its a great machine.
  • Dix Hills NY
  • K75 ABS and R100Mystic

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #36 on: September 04, 2019, 05:17:13 PM »
I have a 94 ABS standard model. Bike is a very easy machine compared to my R bike. It is rather heavy though, but this feeling goes away once you get rolling. The handling, ride and cornering are excellent. It especially likes around 5500rpm on highway in 5th. I ride my K75 every day. Good luck in your quest for a nice one. Its a great machine.

Thanks for the info and encouragement.

I like the idea of the ABS, but am now softening somewhat on that requirement based on the info gleaned here.  I still would definitely prefer one with ABS, but may consider one without ABS if it is an otherwise outstanding candidate.

What sort of speed are you seeing at 5500 rpm in 5th on the highway?  Does a K75 have 5 or 6 gears?

What is it about your K75 that makes it an easy machine compared to your R bike?  R bike being???

Thanks.



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Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #37 on: September 04, 2019, 08:39:29 PM »
It is rather heavy though, but this feeling goes away once you get rolling.
The problem many have is not with the moto's rolling weight; it's with its static weight. Once it is tipped, it is difficult to keep it from falling unless the rider is strong and has firm footing. Once fallen, it takes personal strength or the combined effort of two people to raise it.

The solution, of course, is to stay aware and keep the moto balanced.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #38 on: September 04, 2019, 09:23:03 PM »
While I've ridden a lot of motorcycles over the past 15 years most of my miles have been on a Vespa GTS 250 scooter.  Similar weight to the Rebel.  Six weeks ago I got a 1992 K75 and at Laitch indicates -- the increase in weight demands a few considerations.  That said, I've found the K75 an easy machine to deal with compared with others I've ridden.  Perhaps the biggest challenge for me is learning to be a bit more respectful of the weight when getting on and off the motorcycle.  The scooter is so light that I can throw it around, push it, pull it and get it on the center stand from a lot of awkward positions.  Not so with the K75.  I've had to develop some good habits with both the slow speed maneuvering and the no speed handling.  But otherwise, if you are completely comfortable with the Rebel you'll make the transition ok.

One other thing -- I'm 6'2" so I can easily flatfoot the motorcycle.  That definitely helps.  On the negative side -- at 65 years old I'm not as strong as I once was so I have to be a bit more careful with handling.

Anyway, hope things work out for you.  The K75 is a joy to ride.

Thanks for that feed back and encouragement.  Good to hear you transitioned relatively easily from the Vespa.  We have a couple Honda scooters as well, so although the Rebel is not nearly as heavy as the K75, I do have a good idea what youre talking about. 

It took a bit to get used to the extra heft of the Rebel, but now Im pretty comfortable with it.  Id like to think these skills will transfer well to any larger motorcycle.  Unless there is something especially cumbersome or poorly designed with the weight and balance of a K75? 

  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
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Offline ScooterNSticks

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2019, 11:04:44 PM »
Thanks for that feed back and encouragement.  Good to hear you transitioned relatively easily from the Vespa.  We have a couple Honda scooters as well, so although the Rebel is not nearly as heavy as the K75, I do have a good idea what youre talking about. 

It took a bit to get used to the extra heft of the Rebel, but now Im pretty comfortable with it.  Id like to think these skills will transfer well to any larger motorcycle.  Unless there is something especially cumbersome or poorly designed with the weight and balance of a K75?

I don't think you'll find any difficulties adjusting to the K75 unless you can't flat foot the bike.  Then it might seem cumbersome, especially moving it around.  Just go slow and practice a bit.  Whenever I take a new motorcycle out I usually spent 15 minutes or so in a parking lot experimenting with brakes, clutch and slow speed maneuvers.  Everything feels more cumbersome than the Vespa but you adjust rapidly.  The only motorcycle I remember not adjusting to was the BMW K1600 GTL.  It was a whale.  Nice on the road under power but don't ever stop or try and do a U turn.  Geez it was big and heavy.  I've never ridden a Goldwing but I sense they are similar. 
  • Boalsburg, PA
  • 1992 BMW K75, 2006 Vespa GTS 250ie
My Blog: Scooter in the Sticks
https://scooterinthesticks.com

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #40 on: September 04, 2019, 11:28:17 PM »
Id like to think these skills will transfer well to any larger motorcycle.  Unless there is something especially cumbersome or poorly designed with the weight and balance of a K75?
There is something that can be especially cumbersome about the classic K models. There is plenty written on this site about the need for awareness of its balance point when maneuvering it slowly. Your riding skills will transfer from the Rebel to the Brick once they are thoroughly embedded in your awareness; however, cruiser-style motos like the Rebel differ from Bricks. They place the rider closer to the pavement thus giving the rider's legs stabilizing advantages.

You'll want the benefits that a low-seat on a K75 might give you. You'll need the benefits that riding thousands of miles on the Rebel first will give you.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303
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Offline mlytle

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #41 on: September 05, 2019, 08:14:44 AM »
i acquired one of my K75S's from a shorter guy who rode scooters.  his friends goaded him into getting a real motorcycle.  for some reason he got a K75.  tipped it over in a parking lot move within days of getting it.  never rode it again.  it sat for over a year in his carport before i picked it from clist for cheap....:-)
  • alexandria, va
  • 92 K75s, 94 K75s, 96 K1100RS SE (custodian), 09 K1300s
Marshall
Project Thread "K75s Midlife Refresh"
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,7810.0.html

Offline ScooterNSticks

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #42 on: September 05, 2019, 08:21:20 AM »
There is something that can be especially cumbersome about the classic K models. There is plenty written on this site about the need for awareness of its balance point when maneuvering it slowly. Your riding skills will transfer from the Rebel to the Brick once they are thoroughly embedded in your awareness; however, cruiser-style motos like the Rebel differ from Bricks. They place the rider closer to the pavement thus giving the rider's legs stabilizing advantages.

You'll want the benefits that a low-seat on a K75 might give you. You'll need the benefits that riding thousands of miles on the Rebel first will give you.

Yes, what Laitch said.
  • Boalsburg, PA
  • 1992 BMW K75, 2006 Vespa GTS 250ie
My Blog: Scooter in the Sticks
https://scooterinthesticks.com

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #43 on: September 05, 2019, 08:23:00 AM »
i acquired one of my K75S's from a shorter guy who rode scooters.  his friends goaded him into getting a real motorcycle.  for some reason he got a K75.  tipped it over in a parking lot move within days of getting it.  never rode it again.  it sat for over a year in his carport before i picked it from clist for cheap....:-)

What model and which seat height did that bike have?

He went straight from scooter to K75?  Did he take any training courses or learn to ride on a smaller bike first?  (Scooters dont count.)
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Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #44 on: September 05, 2019, 10:52:07 AM »
I'm handing this over to natural selection.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline ScooterNSticks

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #45 on: September 05, 2019, 12:46:38 PM »
What model and which seat height did that bike have?

He went straight from scooter to K75?  Did he take any training courses or learn to ride on a smaller bike first?  (Scooters dont count.)

If you're referring to me -- I ADDED the K75 to the garage.  So now I have a K75 and a Vespa.  I've taken the Beginning Rider course once and the Advanced Rider course twice.  It was about 15 years ago when I "returned" to riding.  Hadn't gotten on a motorcycle or scooter since high school in 1971.  So the courses were useful and I recommend everyone take them.  Learning to ride is the easy part.  Learning to be on the road is the hard part.  It's like you have to get past all the things you believe riding in a cage.

After a few years with the scooter and having started a blog that suddenly started getting a lot of traffic, the local BMW-Vespa-Ducati-Triump-URAL dealer asked me if I would be interested in doing reviews.  He would give me whatever I wanted and I could play with it and write something on my blog with a link to his place.  So for several years I always had a motorcycle in the garage along with the scooter.  I estimate I put 10 to 15 thousand miles on various machines.  So I wasn't unfamiliar with something as big as the K75 but it had been a few years since I rode anything other than my Vespa.

My K75 has the low seat.  It's fine even though I'm 6'2".

I've seen plenty of men buy a big bike early and regret it because they never got past their uneasiness.  As someone already said, put a lot of miles on that Rebel before you step out for something like the K75.  You'll thank yourself later.  And you'll also learn consumption patience -- a wonderful opportunity for personal growth.

If you need additional restraint and you're married, tell your wife that unlike the slow and underpowered Rebel, the K75 will go 130mph!  She'll probably help you wait.
  • Boalsburg, PA
  • 1992 BMW K75, 2006 Vespa GTS 250ie
My Blog: Scooter in the Sticks
https://scooterinthesticks.com

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #46 on: September 05, 2019, 12:52:38 PM »
Scooternsticks,

No, that question was for mlytle, who bought his K75 from a guy who rode scooters.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
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Offline mlytle

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #47 on: September 05, 2019, 01:43:17 PM »
What model and which seat height did that bike have?

He went straight from scooter to K75?  Did he take any training courses or learn to ride on a smaller bike first?  (Scooters dont count.)
as i said in my post..it was a K75S

it had a corbin seat, which is slightly lower than the standard K75S seat. 


i didn't ask what training he had...just threw a few pennies at him and trailered the bike out of there before he changed his mind...
  • alexandria, va
  • 92 K75s, 94 K75s, 96 K1100RS SE (custodian), 09 K1300s
Marshall
Project Thread "K75s Midlife Refresh"
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,7810.0.html

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #48 on: September 05, 2019, 04:53:27 PM »
as i said in my post..it was a K75S

it had a corbin seat, which is slightly lower than the standard K75S seat. 
.....
i didn't ask what training he had...just threw a few pennies at him and trailered the bike out of there before he changed his mind...

Sorry, I misread your post as K75s, not K75Ss. 

I was genuinely interested to hear more details about his path from scooter to K75.  If he went straight from the scooter to throwing a leg over the K75, without any additional training or practice on a smaller bike, then its not surprising he ran into trouble.  But if he took training and practiced extensively on a smaller bike first, then that could certainly say something about the unforgiving nature of the K75.

Your statement that his friends goaded him into buying a motorcycle, if accurate, suggests he might have hurried the process.  Also, if he was short, he should have targeted a Standard with the low seat. 
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #49 on: September 05, 2019, 04:58:50 PM »
the k75 is a scooter...
Thou shalt not goad.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

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