Author Topic: Greetings and Questions about K75  (Read 1360 times)

Offline VAK75

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Greetings and Questions about K75
« on: September 02, 2019, 01:56:16 PM »
Hello all!

New member from Virginia, USA and prospective K75 purchaser/owner with a number of questions.  Hopefully I'm in the right place to ask them?

I'm in the early stages of researching the purchase of a K75.  I'm focussing on the K75 "standard" (is that the right terminology?) for the low seat height.  I also prefer the simple clean look of this version.  I'd like to find a late-model ('94/'95) with low miles and ABS. 

My first questions concern the optional ABS.  Can this option still be added to a K75 that was not equipped with ABS from the factory?  If yes, is it an oem solution from BMW, or aftermarket?  If no, what is the general sentiment about the desirability of the ABS feature on a K75?  (I come across many good candidates, but they often lack ABS.)

My second question concerns oem or aftermarket saddlebags and associated mounting brackets/legs/hardware.  Are these readily available new?  If not, how difficult is it to find them on the used market?

I have more questions but will hold off - - don't want to overload you folks and not even sure if I've posted in the correct location. 

Thanks!
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2019, 02:21:39 PM »
Welcome.

What is your motorcycle riding experience?
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2019, 02:35:05 PM »
greetings...

to add abs to nonabs brick it will likely have to be oe... you will have to source all the components... will costs thousands for sure...

oe is the way to go for side bags and top box... they are available new and used... click on parts guidance and getts familure with the fische... butts you can fit anything on there f you have tools and skills and piggy bank...

you can find a seven fitty with everything you want if you are patient and wait for the right one to go up for sale...

j o

Thank you.  This info is very helpful.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline stokester

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2019, 02:41:01 PM »
Agree with Johnny. I would never attempt to add ABS to a non-ABS bike.  There are too many hoses, pipes, pumps, rotors, wiring and a computer to add that would make it not worth the cost or effort while there are fine bricks on the market if you are patient.

Here is an example I found nearby Craig's List -> https://easternshore.craigslist.org/mcy/d/ocean-city-1987-bmw-k75c/6960335395.html

While it does not have ABS it looks clean, has low mileage with cases and it appears the seller is knowledgeable of spline maintenance.
  • Yorktown, Virginia
  • '94 K75S Dakar Yellow - '93 K75S Seiden Blau - '91 R100RT Dark Blue- '78 R100S Smoke Red

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2019, 02:52:04 PM »
Welcome.

What is your motorcycle riding experience?

Thanks for the welcome.

My riding experience is very limited.  I took the MSF Basic course a few months ago.  Shortly after that, I purchased a small starter bike (2016 Honda Rebel 250) on which to practice and build my skills/confidence.  I have only logged about 500 miles on it so far. 

But I live in a congested urban environment, so 100% of that is in pretty challenging riding conditions with tons of stop/go and traffic (I have seen references on this website to the detours riders take to avoid my
area.)  It usually takes 60-90 minutes to travel about 20 miles around here.  So my time in the saddle is more than the miles suggest.  But I have very limited time at highway speeds.

I recognize my inexperience, and plan to keep riding the Rebel for quite a while yet.  I may even keep it as a second bike when I eventually upgrade - - it’s actually a lot of fun to ride and well-suited to this area.  But these K75s interest me and due to their age will need a thorough going-over before using.  So I am beginning to sniff around.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2019, 02:54:05 PM »
Most bikes I see of the vintage you are interested in have both side cases and ABS.  Top cases are fairly easy to find if you aren't in too much of a hurry. 

ABS is an OEM system.  There is too much stuff to put together to make the system work.  Personally, I have it on my bikes because they came with it.  It's nice because it gets an insurance discount of $10-20 per year.   I have actually activated the system only once to see if it was working.  Normally, I am leery of hitting the brakes hard enough to activate it because I don't want to find out it isn't working.  Alert defensive driving is more valuable to me than ABS.

Luggage is readily available on eBay along with the necessary hardware.  Adding it is strictly an easy bolt on task as long as the bike has the rack mounted on the tail cowl.  No big deal if the rack isn't there.  You just need to spend an afternoon removing the cowl and drilling four holes.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue, '89 K100RS Special edition White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too
'89 K100RS SE

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2019, 02:57:22 PM »
Agree with Johnny. I would never attempt to add ABS to a non-ABS bike.  There are too many hoses, pipes, pumps, rotors, wiring and a computer to add that would make it not worth the cost or effort while there are fine bricks on the market if you are patient.

Here is an example I found nearby Craig's List -> https://easternshore.craigslist.org/mcy/d/ocean-city-1987-bmw-k75c/6960335395.html

While it does not have ABS it looks clean, has low mileage with cases and it appears the seller is knowledgeable of spline maintenance.

Copy, thanks.

So adding ABS is a no-go.   What is the consensus on the desirability of the ABS feature?  I know ABS is a good thing in theory,  but how is it holding up on 25-year-old bikes?  Reliable, or problematic? 
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2019, 03:00:27 PM »
Most bikes I see of the vintage you are interested in have both side cases and ABS.  Top cases are fairly easy to find if you aren't in too much of a hurry. 

ABS is an OEM system.  There is too much stuff to put together to make the system work.  Personally, I have it on my bikes because they came with it.  It's nice because it gets an insurance discount of $10-20 per year.   I have actually activated the system only once to see if it was working.  Normally, I am leery of hitting the brakes hard enough to activate it because I don't want to find out it isn't working.  Alert defensive driving is more valuable to me than ABS.

Luggage is readily available on eBay along with the necessary hardware.  Adding it is strictly an easy bolt on task as long as the bike has the rack mounted on the tail cowl.  No big deal if the rack isn't there.  You just need to spend an afternoon removing the cowl and drilling four holes.
 

Thank you.  Very helpful.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline volador

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2019, 03:02:24 PM »
Welcome!

I've seen this listing for some time in the NYC area. Clean looking moto, very low miles, looks like "C" type bars not Sport bars
I don't know if its Mystic Red or Marrech Red but I doubt you find another like it

https://newyork.craigslist.org/lgi/mcy/d/hampton-bays-1994-bmw-75/6965416034.html

Another Low Seat model recently listed

https://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/mcy/d/new-york-1995-bmw-k75/6967337429.html

I saw another NYC K75s for sale from one of the MOE's here. Don't know if it was sold or not

Good luck with your search
  • NYC
  • 1991 K100RS 1993 K75S ABS
5 BOROUGHS SISYPHEAN SOCIETY "When Life Throws You A Curve... Lean Into It"

Offline BrickDad

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2019, 03:16:40 PM »
Copy, thanks.

So adding ABS is a no-go.   What is the consensus on the desirability of the ABS feature?  I know ABS is a good thing in theory,  but how is it holding up on 25-year-old bikes?  Reliable, or problematic?

As with any brand-new technology, the 1st iteration is often imperfect.

So it was back in the 1980s with the BMW K-bikes, the very first motorcycles with ABS.

Their ABS was good... for the time.  In no  way was it a perfect system.  It was a 1st try at it.

Welcome to the forum - I have a K75 and am in central Arlington, likely right next door to you, figuratively.

My K75 started life as a "low seat" model.  It is now a "regular/aftermarket seat" model, by my choice.  It took me across the country this Summer.  Frankly, unless you are a VERY short person, I would advise a regular model because the Low Seat model has some significant storage and tool limits.

Go ahead and PM me if you want "life with a K75" -type advice, etc.
  • Arlington County, Virginia
  • K75T, 1995

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2019, 03:29:08 PM »
. . . I live in a congested urban environment, so 100% of that is in pretty challenging riding conditions with tons of stop/go and traffic  It usually takes 60-90 minutes to travel about 20 miles around here.  So my time in the saddle is more than the miles suggest.  But I have very limited time at highway speeds.
Your Rebel is more suitable for chronic traffic congestion; furthermore, you'll develop much needed low-speed skill riding that moto in traffic. Low-speed maneuvering is an essential skill easier to learn and perfect on a moto lighter than a Brick. I recommend viewing Jerry Paladino's Ride Like A Pro Series. Once you've picked up that skill, it will make riding a larger moto more pleasurable.

The Brick wants to be run on the open road as frequently as possible. In congestion its fan will bathe the rider with heat periodically although the naked Brick will be cooler than one with a fairing.

An electric moto would seem to be ideal for congested traffic. More are becoming available on the used market.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2019, 06:09:20 PM »
As with any brand-new technology, the 1st iteration is often imperfect.

So it was back in the 1980s with the BMW K-bikes, the very first motorcycles with ABS.

Their ABS was good... for the time.  In no  way was it a perfect system.  It was a 1st try at it.

Welcome to the forum - I have a K75 and am in central Arlington, likely right next door to you, figuratively.

My K75 started life as a "low seat" model.  It is now a "regular/aftermarket seat" model, by my choice.  It took me across the country this Summer.  Frankly, unless you are a VERY short person, I would advise a regular model because the Low Seat model has some significant storage and tool limits.

Go ahead and PM me if you want "life with a K75" -type advice, etc.

Thanks for the ABS insight. 

Yes, we are near neighbors.  Don’t be surprised to get a pm from me - - I would be curious to test that seat height.  I am only 5’ 7”, with a disproportionately short inseam (28”).  I was assembled from the spare parts bin.  The low seat height of “Standard” trim appeals to me - - I want to be able to flat foot.  As I understand it, the K75 standard had an oem low seat as standard equipment.  (Does anyone happen to know the seat height measurement?)

Incidentally, in your signature you list your 1995 K75 as a “T” model.  I thought the T was only made from ‘86-‘87?

  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2019, 06:10:04 PM »
Welcome!

I've seen this listing for some time in the NYC area. Clean looking moto, very low miles, looks like "C" type bars not Sport bars
I don't know if its Mystic Red or Marrech Red but I doubt you find another like it

https://newyork.craigslist.org/lgi/mcy/d/hampton-bays-1994-bmw-75/6965416034.html

Another Low Seat model recently listed

https://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/mcy/d/new-york-1995-bmw-k75/6967337429.html

I saw another NYC K75s for sale from one of the MOE's here. Don't know if it was sold or not

Good luck with your search

Much appreciated.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2019, 06:17:29 PM »
. . . the K75 standard had an oem low seat as standard equipment.  (Does anyone happen to know the seat height measurement?)
. . .I thought the T was only made from ‘86-‘87?
According to Phil Hawksley's site, 29.90 inches is the low seat height.

As far as the T designation goes, don't get tangled in minutiae.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2019, 06:27:02 PM »
Your Rebel is more suitable for chronic traffic congestion; furthermore, you'll develop much needed low-speed skill riding that moto in traffic. Low-speed maneuvering is an essential skill easier to learn and perfect on a moto lighter than a Brick. I recommend viewing Jerry Paladino's Ride Like A Pro Series. Once you've picked up that skill, it will make riding a larger moto more pleasurable.

The Brick wants to be run on the open road as frequently as possible. In congestion its fan will bathe the rider with heat periodically although the naked Brick will be cooler than one with a fairing.

An electric moto would seem to be ideal for congested traffic. More are becoming available on the used market.

Thanks for the tips.  Like said, I expect to be on the Rebel for a good while.  And if possible will hold onto it after acquiring my “next bike.”  It is a great platform for practicing skills, and for riding around here.

I am considering the K75 for other purposes.  The Rebel is a great bike, but highway cruising is not it’s strong suit.  I would be using the K75 for longer road trips, cruising with camping gear, etc.

How much does a K75 Standard weigh?
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline Laitch

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2019, 06:38:53 PM »
How much does a K75 Standard weigh?
Slightly over 500lbs with all fluids and ready to ride. The Rebel weighs approximately 330lbs. The Rebel has approximately 16 horsepower; the K75 has around 65 horsepower. Experience, good judgment, coordination, upper body strength and humility would be helpful to have before you climb on one.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline BrickDad

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2019, 06:55:43 PM »
Yes, we are near neighbors.  Don’t be surprised to get a pm from me - - I would be curious to test that seat height. 
Incidentally, in your signature you list your 1995 K75 as a “T” model.  I thought the T was only made from ‘86-‘87?

You are welcome to sit-test... I have a very nice used Corbin seat and I junked the OEM low seat.

My bike was ordered by the original owner (as relayed to me by the 2d owner) with the "Touring" plexiglass windshield.  It is a late model (1995)K75 with the standard, or "C" handlebars, a huge round headlight, OEM "City" baggage cases and the OEM 22-liter top case, and this windshield.  I therefore call it a "T" because it is decently set up for touring.

Hope this helps.

BTW - in my experience on several bikes, "flat-footing" while at rest, although reassuring, is not really necessary as long as the rider's toes can touch the pavement on both sides.  By contrast, bikes designed to sit the rider low can be quite hard on our tail bones at the bottom of the spine, because the lower the bike, the more weight that body area has to support.  Also, on "low" bikes the seat material is often skimpy, adding to the problem.  Both these factors often manifest on longer rides.
  • Arlington County, Virginia
  • K75T, 1995

Offline johnny

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2019, 07:02:33 PM »
greetings...

poast up some photos of this t...

you can call it whats its not... butts i wanna see whats it is and was birthed...

some folks call this a " t "...


* 00101_ae1CTC8sSB0_600x450.jpg (45.74 kB . 600x450 - viewed 110 times)

j o
  • :johnny i parks my 96 eleven hundert rs motobrick in dodge county cheezconsin  :johnny

Offline volador

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2019, 07:50:48 PM »
That must be " t " for tall windscreen

Here is one more in your own state. This is one sharp looking K75C ABS !

https://ibmwr.org/index.php/ibmwr-marketplace/show-ad/3219/1994-k75c/falls-church/virginia/united-states/brick-k-bikes-1983-2003-bikes-for-sale/

  • NYC
  • 1991 K100RS 1993 K75S ABS
5 BOROUGHS SISYPHEAN SOCIETY "When Life Throws You A Curve... Lean Into It"

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2019, 09:18:21 PM »
That must be " t " for tall windscreen

Here is one more in your own state. This is one sharp looking K75C ABS !

https://ibmwr.org/index.php/ibmwr-marketplace/show-ad/3219/1994-k75c/falls-church/virginia/united-states/brick-k-bikes-1983-2003-bikes-for-sale/

Thanks.  Yeah, I have spoken with the owner.  It seems like a really nicely fixed-up K75.  Unfortunately he did a seat conversion to raise it up several inches.

I have a gimpy ankle/foot and flat-footing works best for me. 

  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline volador

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2019, 11:20:09 PM »
Low seat and associated mounting hardware can be found and most of the mounting parts are still available at MAX BMW

This MOE was looking to trade his low seat for regular seat

http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,12729.msg112806.html#new
  • NYC
  • 1991 K100RS 1993 K75S ABS
5 BOROUGHS SISYPHEAN SOCIETY "When Life Throws You A Curve... Lean Into It"

Offline mlytle

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2019, 11:29:27 PM »
keep watching the local clist and be patient.  i got both of my K75's through the DC clist.

although the ABS on these bikes is first generation and  very primitive, it works.   if the bike is maintained well the system is very reliable.  make sure it is working on any bike you look at.  easy to tell, there should be no lights flashing in the cluster after rolling the bike a short ways and hitting both brakes.  i intentionally excercise mine regularly.
  • alexandria, va
  • 92 K75s, 94 K75s, 96 K1100RS SE (custodian), 09 K1300s
Marshall
Project Thread "K75s Midlife Refresh"
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,7810.0.html

Offline E30_Crazy

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2019, 11:56:37 PM »
Agree with Johnny. I would never attempt to add ABS to a non-ABS bike.  There are too many hoses, pipes, pumps, rotors, wiring and a computer to add that would make it not worth the cost or effort while there are fine bricks on the market if you are patient.

Here is an example I found nearby Craig's List -> https://easternshore.craigslist.org/mcy/d/ocean-city-1987-bmw-k75c/6960335395.html

While it does not have ABS it looks clean, has low mileage with cases and it appears the seller is knowledgeable of spline maintenance.

+1 for the Seller. Great guy. Bought my K1100RS from him. I believe he has a couple ads up. He was downsizing his fleet when I was visiting/purchasing.
  • Newport News, Virginia
  • '85 K100, '93 K1100RS

Offline VAK75

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2019, 10:03:57 AM »
keep watching the local clist and be patient.  i got both of my K75's through the DC clist.

although the ABS on these bikes is first generation and  very primitive, it works.   if the bike is maintained well the system is very reliable.  make sure it is working on any bike you look at.  easy to tell, there should be no lights flashing in the cluster after rolling the bike a short ways and hitting both brakes.  i intentionally excercise mine regularly.

Thanks for the encouragement.

As far as testing the ABS, when you say “after rolling the bike a short distance”,  is that with the engine on or off, in gear, etc?  Just trying to better understand the test procedure.  Thanks.

PS  It looks like you are another local-to-me K75 owner.
  • Northern Virginia/Metro DC
  • No motobrick yet - - researching

Offline mlytle

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Re: Greetings and Questions about K75
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2019, 12:17:18 PM »
the abs has a self test procedure on start up.  start bike, start riding, hit both brakes, the two red lights on dash should go out.
  • alexandria, va
  • 92 K75s, 94 K75s, 96 K1100RS SE (custodian), 09 K1300s
Marshall
Project Thread "K75s Midlife Refresh"
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,7810.0.html

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