Author Topic: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire  (Read 338 times)

Offline Laitch

  • ^ Quintessential Motobricker
  • Posts: 6732
Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« on: July 28, 2019, 04:06:50 AM »
Ever repair a K75's flat, tubeless rear tire on a dirt road by yourself? Here's what will be helpful to get rolling again:
  • A calm disposition when there is the realization that the moto won't raise up onto the center stand and barely stays vertical using the side stand.
  • A sharp knife or sidecutters.
  • A working air compressor or half a dozen CO2 cartridges. Leaks can be found without tire inflation but that takes great eyesight and luck. Feeling lucky?
  • A tubeless tire repair kit and an understanding of how to use it.
  • A headlamp.
  • A cellphone, or enough charm to convince a stranger that you aren’t a serial killer so you can use the stranger’s phone.
  • Confidence enough that you’re not going to encounter a serial killer while requesting to borrow a cellphone.
  • WiteOut, red blood cells, lipstick, a soapstone stick, tire chalk, or dirt.
  • A water bottle with plenty of water in it or a source of water and something to carry it, or good spittle production. Soap added to the water would help. Dr Bronner's Castile is a good choice and provides reading material during time for recovery from weeping.
  • The side cases attached to help with lowering and lifting the moto.
  • Functional core strength and lower body flexibility.
or
  • AAA's recreational vehicle/motorcycle roadside assistance policy or a similar policy from some other provider.
Rapid work is necessary. Get the water-applying system together next to the tire at the rear of the moto.
  • Attach the compressor to the valve stem—or a CO2 cartridge to the stem and start filling the tire.
  • If the tire inflates enough, raise the moto up on the center stand—PRONTO.
  • Start rotating the wheel while dousing it with water. You're looking for air bubbles from the leak.
  • Use the headlamp, if you haven’t let the batteries discharge. It will help. When you find one, mark the leak with WiteOut, lipstick, blood spatter or etc.
  • Extract whatever is causing the leak. If the leak is out of the tread area, in the sidewall or around the rim, or if the sidewall bead has pulled away from the rim, temporary repair won't be possible.
  • Take the reamer from the repair kit and ream hell out of the hole until it is round.
  • Put glue on the reamer and run it into and out of the hole.
  • Put a plugging strip into the insertion tool's slot, center it into the slot then glop glue onto it until it is completely covered.
  • Push the glue-soaked plug into the hole about two thirds of its folded length then remove the insertion tool. This will take strong determination. If you can shave your head before you do this, that's likely to help.
  • Cut the plug off close to the surface.
  • Keep looking for holes and repairing them. You might need to inflate the tire again to help with rotating the wheel if the moto is on the center stand.
  • Repair the other leaks then do the final inflation and check for leaks.
If leakage is minimal, hit the road and get somewhere you can enjoy life while you're looking for a new tire and somebody to mount it, unless you have access to tire irons, zip ties and a high-pressure air compressor. Balancing can be done later.

That's tire repair—short form. Where do core and leg strength enter the picture? You'll need them when you realize that for reasons of gravity, or geological formation, you can't raise the moto onto the center stand. It could be the tire leaks too rapidly or that the ground is too soft. You'll need to tip the moto onto its right side so the wheel can be rotated or removed.

Here's where having the cases attached helps. A case will help to protect the rear indicator stem and help to lessen impact when the moto is lowered onto its right side. It will also serve as a fulcrum so you can rotate the wheel instead of needing to remove it.
  • Put the transmission in gear so the moto won't roll away from you.
  • Move to the right side.
  • Lock the steering to the left then with one hand on the right end of the handlebar and one hand over the moto, pull the moto over center, grab the handlebar with both hands then lower the moto to the road or road’s shoulder. Over it goes. The side case will limit the severity of impact.
  • Keep your back as straight as possible and get your thighs to carry the weight, too.
  • Now that it's on its side, put the transmission in neutral, inflate the tire as much as possible then start looking for and repairing leaks.
  • When you're ready to raise the moto, put the transmission in gear, check to be certain the side stand is extended, move the handlebar as much as is possible to the left then lift the moto up, over center and onto its side stand. You can do this either facing the moto with both hands on the handlebar in a mighty, hernia-inducing heave-ho, or lift it by facing away from it, squatting, grabbing the handlebar with your left hand and somewhere on the frame with your right hand then pushing it upright by walking backwards and lifting at the same time.
The Internet is packed with videos of diminutive riders launching their motos into an upright position using the walk-backward technique. Most of the motos are cruisers with giant loop crashbars and handlebars the width of bull elk antlers and their seats were only about 18 inches from the ground before they were tipped anyway. Good luck with that.

Once the moto is upright, get a tire soon. The tire plug is probably not long for this world if it has been your first attempt at repair.

The alternative to these two methods of tire repair is to pay for AAA’s (or some other reliable provider's) motorcycle/recreational vehicle roadside assistance policy and call them up to deliver you unto salvation. That will give you 100 miles of free towing to the destination of your choice. You can call your parents, grandparents, peculiar uncle, repressed or uninhibited aunt, lover or lovers as the case may be, valet, guardian ad litem or lawyer for help arranging a salubrious outcome.

Today's ride brought these techniques to the forefront of my awareness. Order is out to American Moto Tire. Maybe I'll have it by Tuesday.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75T 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

Offline billday

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  • Posts: 1137
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2019, 06:35:44 AM »
In my opinion, this post should earn you a free subscription.
  • New York State, USA 10977
  • 1985 K100

Offline BlitzenGruv

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 196
  • My first BMW. Been riding old British forever..
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2019, 12:51:12 AM »
Excellent write up, as usual Laitch.
I carry repair plugs and a small 12V pump with me. Just hope that I never need them.

I have not so fond memories of repairing a flat on my Triumph in 90 degree heat. Tube and rim locks made it a bit more trouble.
  • Crossville, TN
  • '92 K100rs, 16v, '71 BSA Lightning, '72 Triumph Bonneville, '72 Triumph Trident
You say I'm schizophrenic, but I don't believe we are.

Offline natalena

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 402
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2019, 09:16:58 AM »
Superb article, concise and authoritative. I give it 5.5 Monkey Nutz, only because it lacks notation if you're using strap-on's.
++ AAA, bonus is the A/C truck cab. Still carry repair kit, but it works better starting campfires with the plugs.
  • East of Joshua Tree
  • 1987 K75s #0919
On Holy Quest seeking Techron equivalent for splines.

Offline Chaos

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  • Posts: 2404
  • Mars needs women!
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2019, 09:19:58 AM »
in my experience...

Check tire for roofing nail that used to reside on my garage floor
remove nail and plug hole (breaking fingernail before realizing pliers are in toolroll)
use all 3 CO2 cartridges to inflate to about 10psi
proceed slowly to a real air compressor
  • sw ohio
1987 K75S    VIN 0231
Original owner, Original litter
200,000 miles (plus or minus) and 5 paint jobs
2012 Ural 2WD sidecar (BMW's bastard step child)

Offline beemuker

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 482
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2019, 09:09:49 AM »
Excellent write up, as usual Laitch.
I carry repair plugs and a small 12V pump with me. Just hope that I never need them.

I have not so fond memories of repairing a flat on my Triumph in 90 degree heat. Tube and rim locks made it a bit more trouble.
that 12v pump works great with a car battery but will drain your moto battery enough for a no start pretty quick, don't ask me how I know
  • Panama City, FL
  • 94 K75s , Dakar yellow ABS

Offline johnny

  • TrailBrakingThrottleWhacker
  • ^ Quintessential Motobricker
  • Posts: 6661
  • Whacking...n...Chopping Sliding...n...High Siding
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2019, 10:07:30 AM »
 :threadjacked

slime... donts leave without one...

accugage... dont leave without one...

when stickey worms and mushroom pluggs aints enough...

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j o
  • :johnny i parks my 96 eleven hundert rs motobrick in dodge county cheezconsin  :johnny

Offline ScooterNSticks

  • ^ Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 68
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2019, 11:09:56 AM »
I'll endeavor to memorize the tire repair outline in case I ever actually have to do that.

And Johnny -- you make tire repair look almost romantic in that idyllic landscape.  Why would anyone ever want to call AAA when you can meditate in the gravel under a blue sky!
  • Boalsburg, PA
  • 1992 BMW K75, 2006 Vespa GTS 250ie
My Blog: Scooter in the Sticks
https://scooterinthesticks.com

Offline natalena

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 402
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2019, 06:38:01 PM »
Great pictorial. 10 more feet and you'd be working in the shade.
  • East of Joshua Tree
  • 1987 K75s #0919
On Holy Quest seeking Techron equivalent for splines.

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

  • ^ Quintessential Motobricker
  • Posts: 4539
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2019, 06:59:13 PM »
I have been incredibly lucky so far, but feel like I'm due.  I carry a stop and go tire kit and some of the worms along with a Honda labeled Slime compressor.

The new K100RS I just got has 18+ year old Metzlers on it that are going to be replaced.  I think I'll take an afternoon and punch some holes in them and see how the stuff I've been hauling around works to repair them.  Thinking about it, it's not a bad idea to practice doing tire repairs on a tire that's going to be replaced.  Glad this thread got me thinking about it.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '91K100RS White/Blue
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline Laitch

  • ^ Quintessential Motobricker
  • Posts: 6732
Re: Repairing A K75's Flat Rear Tire
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2019, 07:42:54 PM »
. . . 10 more feet and you'd be working in the shade.
What are the chances that a yahoo driving a beater while working through personal issues along a deserted back road by means of free-spirited acceleration coupled with ingestion of bath salt-laced Bulleit rye shots will notice a man wearing a dark shirt and dark pants bent over working on a dark moto in the shade?
  :thisplacewhack

I carry a light, reflective scream green mesh safety vest in my tankbag so I can shed my 10lb riding jacket and work in relative comfort and safety wearing it instead.

I'll endeavor to memorize the tire repair outline in case I ever actually have to do that.
Don't bother. Clearly, you have been anointed. Just give succor to those who must ream the living hell out of their tires to plug them. Shine your light upon them. Verily, carry spare batteries.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75T 72,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.
http://www.motobrick.com/index.php/topic,296.msg53303.html#msg53303

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