Author Topic: My first K bike  (Read 737 times)

Offline Scott

  • Curious
  • Posts: 8
My first K bike
« on: September 06, 2018, 09:33:18 PM »
Bought my first k bike today,  I've always liked them,  but never could find a clean one,  most are high milage ones.   I found a 1993, low miles example,  so i bought it.   I've only had Airheads as far as beemers go, so this pretty complex,  FI bike kinda scares the jebbesers (sp?) out of me.  Anyway, I'll see how it goes.   It runs wonderfully so far and is so smooth,  the smoothness reminds me of an old Suzuki water buffalo i had a number of years ago, in fact i had two,  and a gt 550 as well.   Lots of Japanese 2 strokes.  Cheers.   Scott.
  • SoCal
  • bmw R100r, bmw k75, hondapotamus G/W, XT 500 enduro

Offline caveman

  • ^ Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 65
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2018, 10:30:38 PM »
Very  nice looking bike with low seat, welcome and enjoy!
  • Kennerdell, PA.
  • 87 K100RT, 88 K100LT

Offline Chaos

  • ^ Quintessential Motobricker
  • Posts: 2218
  • Mars needs women!
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2018, 10:39:25 PM »
Nice looking survivor there!  They are more complex than an airhead, but they are also so much less needy.  Enjoy!
  • sw ohio
1987 K75S    VIN 0231
Original owner, Original litter
200,000 miles (plus or minus) and 5 paint jobs
2012 Ural 2WD sidecar (BMW's bastard step child)

Offline Barry in IN

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 134
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2018, 07:15:20 AM »
Welcome!
  • Indiana
  • 1992 K75S Lili Von Shtuppe
A pox on cafe “builders”

Offline Laitch

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  • Posts: 5766
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2018, 07:18:06 AM »
Welcome. Thanks for the photo.

If you haven't inspected the interior of the fuel tank and the condition of the rubber fuel pump vibration damper that surrounds the fuel pump in its holder, remove the four screws holding the fuel cap assembly, remove the assembly and take a look. The damper should not be malleable or showing disintegration nor should there be floaters and discoloration in there. Reinstall the fuel cap assembly with the same orientation as original—hinge rearward.

If you're scared of fuel injection, it's interesting you've chosen to ride motorcycles instead of taking a bus or cab. :giggles

This fuel injection system is not complex and as Chaos has alluded, really needs no input from you. Adjusting valve clearance on your two valve K engine is a 20K mile interval task, unlike an Airhead. The air filter can be reused and its cleaning procedure takes less than five minutes if you don't try to figure out how to remove it by yourself. :giggles  Downloadable manuals are on the site and videos of many procedures are scattered throughout threads. Follow the search instructions and finding information you need should be easy if English is your first language; however, there are usually helpful loiterers at hand if you get stalled.

Just inspect the electrical plugs throughout the bike for clean and tight connections. Ride the moto far and often; don't use it as a fuel storage vessel.

The Repair Guidance section has introductory and extensive repair information. Good luck.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75T 68,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.

Offline stokester

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 411
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2018, 08:32:53 AM »
Very nice!  Is that the actual mileage?

I ride and wrench on airheads along with my K75s and find the bricks easy to work on with a wealth of information here and on other sites. 

Checking valve clearances is simple, just requires a couple of readily available tools and shims.  The fuel injection system is pretty simple compared to more modern setups but because of age requires special attention to electrical connectors, especially for the fuel pump.  Like on our airheads the clutch splines should be cleaned and lubed but there is also a need to lube the splines at the final drive.  I do mine with every rear tire change.

Ride safe.
  • Yorktown, Virginia
  • '94 K75S - '93 K75S - '91 R100RT - '78 R100S

Offline Scott

  • Curious
  • Posts: 8
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2018, 08:58:12 AM »
Thanks for the comments.   I plan on the routine maintenance,  fluids, new tires, service D/S splines, inspect the fuel pump, and give it a complete going over.  Yes, that's original mileage,  but at least it sat indoors in SoCal.   I bought a 1995 R100r mystic a while back with 6k on the clock, so i understand what goes bad from sitting a long time.  I ride everyday here in So Cal, taking the Tundra only when i need to.  I guess I've had in excess of 50 motorbikes over the last 40 years or so.    Cheers.  Scott.
  • SoCal
  • bmw R100r, bmw k75, hondapotamus G/W, XT 500 enduro

Offline mw074

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 235
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2018, 09:07:11 AM »
.
Reinstall the fuel cap assembly with the same orientation as original—hinge rearward.

Laitch, I see another reference to the gas cap orientation. The reason that you find K bikes with the gas cap reversed is it makes the bike much easier to fuel when running the BMW OEM tank bag. I won't argue whether or not it effects the overall performance.
  • Michigan

Offline The Mighty Gryphon

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  • Posts: 3966
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2018, 09:18:33 AM »
.
Laitch, I see another reference to the gas cap orientation. The reason that you find K bikes with the gas cap reversed is it makes the bike much easier to fuel when running the BMW OEM tank bag. I won't argue whether or not it effects the overall performance.

Fuel cap orientation is important to prevent water from entering the tank when the cap is reversed and covers the drain hole in the tank indentation.  If you must reverse the cap, file a notch in the flange to prevent covering the drain hole.
  • In my garage in Marilla, NY
  • '94 K75RT Mystic Red, '92K100RS White, '94 K75S Dakar Yellow
Current:
'94 K75RT "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS"
'94 K75S "Cheetos"
'91 K100RS "Moby Brick Too

Offline mw074

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 235
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2018, 09:21:14 AM »
Fuel cap orientation is important to prevent water from entering the tank when the cap is reversed and covers the drain hole in the tank indentation.  If you must reverse the cap, file a notch in the flange to prevent covering the drain hole.

I agree.
  • Michigan

Offline Laitch

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  • Posts: 5766
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2018, 01:40:47 PM »
I won't argue whether or not it effects the overall performance.
Good choice.
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75T 68,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.

Offline natalena

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 114
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2018, 03:55:44 PM »
Congrats on the new-to-you Brick, especially in such nice condition. I've had vehicles stored in San Diego at a great facility, over the years all cars/motorcycles have the same thing in common...rubber bit's all dry and deteriorate. Good luck with the restoration, Angeles Crest is calling ;)
  • East of Joshua Tree
  • 1987 K75s #0919

Offline alabrew

  • ^ Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 67
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2018, 05:53:14 PM »
.
Laitch, I see another reference to the gas cap orientation. The reason that you find K bikes with the gas cap reversed is it makes the bike much easier to fuel when running the BMW OEM tank bag. I won't argue whether or not it effects the overall performance.

I don't understand. My OEM tank bag unzips to the rear and tips up like the (properly orientated) fuel cap allowing full access to fuel. Reversed, it would only give 6" or so between the flap and bag other than releasing the side straps instead of the zippers and tilting the bag forward.

BTW, my side straps are getting weak and occasionally releasing while riding. Anyone have any tips on replacing them?
  • Alabama
  • 1985 K100, 1991 K100RS
Also:
2005 K1200LT
1979 R65
200,000 miles on BMW motorcycles

Offline mdk_mdk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 33
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2018, 06:36:54 PM »
I'd be interested in how to replace those straps also, mine are no longer flexible.
  • Ringoes NJ
  • 1990 K75

Offline Laitch

  • ^ Quintessential Motobricker
  • Posts: 5766
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2018, 07:23:11 PM »
BTW, my side straps are getting weak and occasionally releasing while riding. Anyone have any tips on replacing them?
I'd be interested in how to replace those straps also, mine are no longer flexible.
Thou shalt not threadjack nor covet thy neighbor's ox nor ass nor resilient tankbag straps.  :oldguy:
  • Along the Ridley in Vermont.
  • 1995 K75T 68,000 miles
I wept because I had no radials until I met a man who had no splines.

Offline stokester

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 411
Re: My first K bike
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2018, 07:23:50 PM »
I'd be interested in how to replace those straps also, mine are no longer flexible.
Just like the BMW Multivario tank bag I use on my airheads, I unclasp one side or the other to move the bag off to the side to refuel no real need to unzip anything.

I did have the side strap elastics replaced on the airhead bag by a leather store who catered to the HD vest and patch crowd.  She had the equipment and did a fine job.
  • Yorktown, Virginia
  • '94 K75S - '93 K75S - '91 R100RT - '78 R100S

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