Author Topic: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration  (Read 4498 times)

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Front Forks
« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2018, 12:22:10 PM »
With the yokes in progress and aiming to be ready for the forks, it was time to get them moving.

Each fork was dismantled in turn and all the parts for each kept separate to avoid mixing these up.

First off was the top cap ...



... the drain plug removed and the oil caught (not before I got an oily leg!) in a bucket, while this was draining the dust seal and oil seal clip were removed.

Once drained, the drain plug was popped back in and the fork chucked in the vice horizontally…



… so the damper retaining bolt could be taken out. And the stantion sharply pulled to strike the bushes against the (leaking) oil seal repeatedly to drive this out and release the lower so the stantion could be put back in the vice.

To release the fork internals, a deep socket was put on the top of the fork cap and fork spring compressed with a ratchet strap holding the compressed internals steady while I (climbed on the bench due to the height) released the retaining clip with 2 picks...



... the strap released and the top cap removed.

The stantion was the laid horizontal in the vice and the damper rod pushed into the fork to push the internals out of the far end.

The lowers were cleaned up and given the wire brush drill attachment treatment ready to be brought together with the yoke parts and bridging piece so these can be primed, colour coated and lacquered.

With the fork lowers a bridging piece primed, colour coated and lacquered, everything for the forks was brought back together (including the new progressive springs) ...



... and reassembly started, one fork at a time.

Firstly the damper rod and spring assembly were slotted into the stantion and the new progressive spring added with the spacer left out due to the longer spring. The top washer was added, o-ring replaced and smeared with fork oil before fitting onto the fork top cap and compressed, so the cap was low enough in the stantion to allow the snap ring to be installed, and allow the compression to be released before removing from the vice...



... the stantion was fitted with the lower bushing and stop before being slid into the lower slider and the damper rod bolt with new washer fitted alongside new fittings, replacing the old furry parts with shiny new ones.

The upper bushing was fitted with a seal driver, seal washer added, oil seal smeared with fork oil and fitted with the seal driver, followed by the retaining clip...



... and, following the advice of the Haynes Manual, a generous smear of grease was added before the dust seal was popped on, followed by the gaiter.

The whole assembly was then clamped back into the vice and the top cap removed along with the spring, once again...



... to allow the fork to be partially filled with 7.5Wt fork oil and pumped until all the air was expelled and the oil topped up to the specified depth (170mm with the progressive springs). The spring, washer, top cap and snap ring were replaced. The o-ring was smeared with fork oil, replaced on the top cap bolt and the bolt fitted.

With all that done, the forks were refitted in the yokes, with the tops flush with the upper face of the top yoke, and clamped into position, the fork brace was added...



... and the front wheel bolted back in (temporarily)and the gaiter clamped into place...



... alongside the old rear shock being refitted (temporarily), this leaves me with a rolling frame!

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Frame Handle
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2018, 01:41:02 PM »
With having a rolling frame now, it seemed sensible to get the fold out handle sorted to make the main stand a bit easier to use. Although it wasn’t in bad shape, it was worth getting it sorted out.

Firstly a straight pick (flathead screwdriver would do) was used to ease the handle rubber off the core…



… allowing me to get all the parts together, nothing needed replacing.

… and the rubber stuck on the core left to act as a key when the rubber goes back on.

The core was marked up to protect the remaining rubber and the remainder stripped to bare metal with a wire brush on a drill before being primed, colour coated and lacquered to match the frame.

Once cured, everything was brought back together…



… and the core was offered up to the spindle on the frame, to make sure I hadn’t gone too crazy with the paint!

The rubber was cleaned up and the core smeared with contact adhesive, rather than the usual method of smearing both sides of the things needed to be stuck together, and the handle rubber slipped onto the core (effectively using the adhesive as a lubricant). The rubber was aligned with the remaining rubber on the core and left to dry.

The spindle the handle runs on was very lightly greased (as it’s a fairly tight fit) with general multipurpose grease and the handle was added…



… before the spring was lightly lubricated and inserted with the top retaining clip in to it’s channel.

The spring was pulled with a spring puller to allow the bottom clip to be put in place and the bottom end of the spring wound to allow the clip to seat.

With a few checks for operation, all was good.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline stokester

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  • Posts: 413
Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration
« Reply #27 on: July 28, 2018, 04:46:43 PM »
Nice work, thanks for posting.
  • Yorktown, Virginia
  • '94 K75S - '93 K75S - '91 R100RT - '78 R100S

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Engine Covers
« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2018, 08:43:16 AM »
With a few mates wanting help with their bikes, I had to push on and get the BMW ready to roll off the bench. With the fame able to roll, that meant cracking on with the engine covers.

These cases have been subject to 12-ish years of exposure to the elements...



... so they definitely needed the attention!

To start with, the cases were treated to a thorough wire brushing..



... to get rid of the previous paint and prepare the surface.

Once stripped, the elements of the covers I wanted to polish up were given a polish with a drill mop and some polish bar although not immediately apparent, this will really make the finished case look good!

The polished bits were masked over and tapped round with a pin hammer (same as making a gasket) to get the masking to fit perfectly...



... and it was ready for painting.

With the bench covered with newspaper to capture the overspray, the cover was treated to 4 thin layers of Halfords Engine Enamel and allowed to cure for a few days.

Once cured, the masking was carefully removed...



... to reveal the polished elements.

The mating faces were cleaned up on the cover and the crankcase and a thin smear of sealant added before the covers were replaced...



... timing cover first as the ends provide the mating face for both cam and crank covers.

The timing sensors were fitted and wiring for the oil and water pump were fed back through the timing cover to allow the final cover to be replaced with its gasket...



... to complete the cover replacement.

The sump cover was removed and given a good clean up, but nothing further was needed, and replaced with a smear of sealant on the mating faces, the filter cover had its o-ring smeared with oil to aid sealing.

Now, just the oil and water pump to go and it can be moved (as long as I chuck a wooden chock in to protect the main stand)...

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
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BMW K75RT Ultima: Oil & Water Pump
« Reply #29 on: August 01, 2018, 04:30:53 PM »
With the Oil & Water Pump being located on the front of the engine it takes a fair old beating during use, so it was due a bit of attention.

This beating was seen by just how stuck on the cover was, this had to be pushed out from behind...



... and the residual coolant left to drain before the mounting bolts could be removed to release the whole assembly.

From a good look at the pump no leaks were evident and none were experienced on riding the bike, so only a good clean up was needed...



... as the paintwork was in bad shape.

All the loose paint pretty much fell off, with the stubborn bits being helped off with a combination of wire brush and No. 1 Green Paint Stripper ...



... before a good clean got it ready to mask up.

The pump was masked up with the old gasket making technique used to ensure a perfect fit.

The pump then had 4 coats of Halfords Engine Enamel before being left to cure and then being removed of the masking...



... before everything was bought back together and the o-rings, bolts and washers were replaced with new items or upgrades (mainly with stainless bolts.

The unit was rebuilt, pressure relief valve plug and internals...



... before pressure sensors and pump prepared for refitting.

The mating face was given alight smear of sealant, as there is no gasket for this, and the drive cog fitted to ensure alignment...



... before the drive cog being refitted to the engine as well as the new o-ring (smeared with a little oil) followed by the pump itself.

The mounting bolts, pressure relief plug and sensors were torqued up, while access was good, the wiring for the sensors was fed through and connected.

The cover mating surfaces were cleaned up and a smear of sealant applied before it was attached to the pump...



... and the cover bolts torqued up, finishing the job!

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Online Filmcamera

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  • Posts: 1231
Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration
« Reply #30 on: August 02, 2018, 08:53:24 AM »
It is looking great, this bike is going to look like it just rolled off the factory floor by the time you are done!
  • San Jose, Costa Rica
  • 1991 K100RS 16v ABS1
Poserbricker
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Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration
« Reply #31 on: August 02, 2018, 04:24:51 PM »
That's the hope, but there is always going to have to be a budget in mind - I'd rather spend time than money (given I enjoy the time spent mainly!)
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline natalena

  • ^ Proficient Motobricker
  • Posts: 118
Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration
« Reply #32 on: August 05, 2018, 01:27:47 PM »
Thanks for posting images and detailing the procedures. It's inspiring to see the progress.
  • East of Joshua Tree
  • 1987 K75s #0919
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Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Rear Brake Disc
« Reply #33 on: August 05, 2018, 02:39:18 PM »
With the bike able to be rolled, it was time to fix on the rear brake disc.

I gave this a good look over and the disc is well within service limits and, despite a slight lip, the disc is looking good ...



... ...so this had a clean up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner before it was mounted back onto the bevel box ...



... ... with new bolts used, with the threads covered in medium thread lock, before being torqued up.

The back wheel was popped back on to restore the rolling ability and hopefully no need to remove the brake disc during the rest of the build.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Exhaust System
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2018, 01:17:21 PM »
As the main stand stops are on the exhaust, and I want to be able to use the main stand and still be able to move the bike, the exhaust was next.

Starting with the headers...



... which were cleaned up with a damp cloth before using OptiGlanz stainless steel cleaner, followed by light use of wire brush attachment on a drill - for the more stubborn bits.

The headers were then polished up with Autosol Metal Polish and wire wool...



... before being buffed up with a mop attachment on a drill.

The headers were then test fitted to ensure everything was as it should be.

This was then removed and as the manifold end of the exhaust is given a battering, they were masked up (leaving enough bare metal to seal in the manifold) before these were given a treatment of Kurust and a coat of black engine enamel...



... to protect them in the future.

Once all the paintwork was cured, the headers were fitted onto the bike...



... and torqued up, using a smear of nickel grease and new nuts.

The rest of the system was emptied of the old connection gasket ...



... and a new one ordered (from Germany, as the UK seems to have more hen's teeth), and the system disassembled.

The end can was inspected...



... before being cleaned up with a damp cloth, treatment using OptiGlanz stainless steel cleaner, followed by light use of wire brush attachment on a drill - for the more stubborn bits.

The exhaust were then polished up with Autosol Metal Polish and wire wool...



... before being buffed up with a mop attachment on a drill.

The rubber stand stop was cleaned up and added back onto the exhaust before this was then put to one side to await the footrest hangers and the mounting bracket.

The bracket itself was in reasonably poor shape ...



... but it was stripped and primer applied, so a good view of the remaining strength could be done.

But, while thinking about it overnight, the metal seemed a bit thin...



... having lost about half it's thickness to corrosion. So a replacement was ordered but the primed mount will be used for the time being.

The exhaust sealing ring arrived from Germany and was slotted into the silencer...



... in as far as the internal stop.

The exhaust was connected, using a fair amount of twisting and swearing, clamped up and mounted...



... onto the awaiting bare footrest hangers.

Once the replacement mounting arrived, this was bolted straight on and all was done (I'll worry about the heat shield for the exhaust later, as it's a job in itself!)

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Footrest Hangers
« Reply #35 on: August 14, 2018, 01:23:41 PM »
With the exhaust required for the main stand to be supported when in the up position, it needs to hang off something ... so time to get the footrest hangers done to coincide with the exhaust.

The footrests were stripped back, with all the rubbers footrests and other parts removed, leaving just the hangers ...



... which were in turn stripped of paintwork, ready for reconditioning ...



... and given a couple of coats of Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Lacquer Enamel ...



... and allowed to cure.

Once cured, the masking was removed...



... and the edges tidied up with a scalpel.

The top mount of each footrest is an earthing point, so each was cleaned up to ensure a good electrical connection for the ABS system.

The footrests were mounted up...



... and bought back together with the exhaust...



... to allow the bike to be moved with a bit more ease.

As I don't want to be walking into the footrests continuously, these will be sorted later.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Ignition Coils
« Reply #36 on: August 18, 2018, 03:28:36 AM »
Time for another quick win I think!

During disassembly of the bike, the coils remained on the wiring loom as they were difficult to remove, but the time has come to remove them.

Each coil connector was sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and allowed to soak in before these were wiggled until they released from the coil pack

The electrical connection on the rear most coil pack had definitely suffered the most from corrosion….



… but it was salvageable with some more electrical contact cleaner and a scotch pad.

With the coil packs freed, everything was pulled together…



... and the cradle stripped down and the surface corrosion cleaned up followed by cleaning up the fittings to ensure no electrical conductivity via the mounting bolts, but good conductivity between the coil pack mounting and the earthing point for the cradle.

Once completed, the mounting fittings were used to bolt the cradle back into place…



… the coil packs cleaned up, electrical contact points rubbed clean with a scotch pad and mounted onto the cradle.

The electrical conductivity was checked with the test coil contact isolated from the cradle and found to be good.

So the HT leads were connected to the spark plugs before being threaded through and onto the correct coil pack…



… foremost to foremost, rearmost to rearmost and the remaining connection was obvious from there!

The electrical connection and covers will be done later, as access is needed for now.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

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  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration: tragkorb Rails
« Reply #37 on: September 23, 2018, 03:58:18 AM »
So, after some woodwork and a week in the Lake District on a walking holiday (even managed a chat with a friendly K75 owner), it was back to the project.

Next up are the tragkorb rails, these were pulled out of the pile of bits and checked over...



... and with all looking good, these just had a tidy up with a wipe of WD-40...



... the rails were good to go.

All the fixings were replaced with stainless nuts and bolts before the rails were reattached, using a little copper grease where the badly corroded fixings were...



... and job's a good 'un, simple one after holiday!

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleproject.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Gear Lever
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2018, 12:09:05 PM »
With things coming back together and the bike being taken off the table from time to time, it seemed reasonable to get the gear lever done (as the brakes are not commissioned yet).

I would say I pulled all the parts together, but I just picked up the gear lever out of the box!

But I did strip it down in to the bewildering array of pieces ...



... or 4 (lever, rubber, bolt and washer).

From here the lever was stripped using a wire brush attachment on a drill (well a stub of one as I've used it so much) before priming the lever in Autotek Etch Primer, top coating with Halfords Gloss Black Enamel before Halfords Clear Lacquer Enamel.

Once painted, everything was bought back together, the rubber fitted, the bolt and washer replaced  and the lever reattached to the bike...



... another little job done!

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motorcycleprojects. wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Airbox
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2018, 12:22:07 PM »
Time for another quick job, and as the top of the engine is looking a little bare ... that means airbox.

The airbox was stripped down, cleaned and all the parts pulled together ...



... the base was bolted onto the engine ...



... and the air filter replaced (as this was replaced at the last service according to previous owner and looks in very good condition).

The air flow sensor & controller unit, with the air delivery tube were added to the top section of the airbox ...



... and popped onto the filter...



... and clipped into place with 2 clips, while the third required stripping and repainting due to corrosion damage. Once cured the last clip was added and that's job done.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Hilltopper46

  • ^ Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 66
Re: BMW K75RT Ultima: Airbox
« Reply #40 on: October 01, 2018, 01:26:04 PM »

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleproject.wordpress.com/

The WWW says the link doesn't exist. Looks like you dropped an 's'. Hope this is helpful.
  • East Troy, WI
  • 1995 K1100LT
Current bike - 1995 K1100LT - It RUNS!. You says Plum, DMV says Purple, BMW says Navana Violet.

Previously: 1982 XJ650 Yamaha, 1987 GoldWing, 1995 GoldWing, 2001 FLSTC, 2003 Goldwing

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration
« Reply #41 on: October 01, 2018, 01:35:36 PM »
All updated, cheers for the heads up!
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Rear Suspension
« Reply #42 on: October 05, 2018, 11:28:15 AM »
The state of the rear shock against the newly repainted swing arm, frame and bevel box has been annoying me for a few weeks now so, it was time to deal with it.

I got the unit out and into the vice to discover all the rubber parts were badly perished, but the operation was OK.

So, recommissioning it was, first job was compress the spring and undo the top cap...



... so it was compressed well away from the cap with spring compressors, but the cap would not budge from the damper rod after over an hour of variously methods to remove it. So I was left scratching my head a bit, to say the least.

After a bit of research I had the option of sending it off for reconditioning, buy a used part or buy an upgrade unit. On the balance of cost, I plumbed for an upgraded unit...



... which just looks a lot better and is easier all round.

The unit was slotted into place and stainless fittings used to replace the old bits, I figured that if I went for a new shock then I might as well make it a proper job...



... and with that all on, job done.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

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  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Rear Brakes
« Reply #43 on: October 06, 2018, 01:30:34 PM »
Next in line was the rear brake assembly. As the K doesn't have linked brakes, I'm not forced to do the whole braking system at once.

Starting with laying everything out for the system ...



... everything looks good, but dirty, except a rubber boot on one of the pistons in the rear caliper but just touching this caused it to return to it's seat, so no major issues there.

The caliper had the pins drifted out with a punch ...



... to allow the removal of the pads and rubber boots, the caliper was in good working order, the strip down didn't go any further.

The bleed nipple was removed and bolts popped into the open brake fluid channels, before the caliper was cleaned up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner before being remounted on the bike and the original grease nipple replaced ...



... the fittings will be replaced once the paint work on the system is complete.

Next was the ABS sensor, the bracket of which had suffered a little from exposure to brake dust which was rubbed down and masked up. the masking covered the base of the internal side of the bracket to ensure the same clearance on the ABS sensor as before hand and avoiding any shimming up.

The bracket was given a couple of coats of Halfords Black Engine Enamel, as there will be some heat exposure ...



... before being mounted back onto the rear caliper and torqued up to the setting in the Haynes Manual.

The sensor itself was cleaned up and the original shims used (again to preserve the original clearance) and mounted into the bracket.

The gap was measured with feeler gauges and found to be 0.4 mm, well within the 0.35 to 0.65 mm range stated, that's sorted then!

The next item to strip off and sort out are the brake fluid lines. These had the ends cleaned up with a wire wheel attachment to remove the road crud and surface corrosion build up, before 2 M10 bolts were used per line, as well as the original copper washers, to ensure no paint got in the area it would meet brake fluid in the future ...



... before being masked up and given 2 coats of MOTIP Silver Brake Caliper Spray before being de-masked ...



... and allowed to cure.

While I was doing that, I got to work on the ABS bracket and the bottom half of the battery box by cleaning up the battery box to find it was in quite good shape, so nothing really needed there, before treating the ABS mounting bracket to a wire brush drill attachment, Autoteck Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer.

Once everything was cured the battery box was bolted back onto the ABS bracket, using cleaned up fittings and new nuts/washers ...



... before being bolted back onto the top of the gearbox so the basis of the reassembly was ready.

The master cylinder, reservoir and connecting hose were in good shape and fully functional so it was just cleaned up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner before being fitted to the back of the right hand footrest, using the original bolts (which were in good condition) ...



... and bolted to the bike meaning the first part of the system is reinstated.

Next on the component list was the ABS pump for the rear brake, which showed both surface corrosion and had paint flaking off ...



... so the areas with corrosion were stripped back to bare metal to ensure I got rid of it before the rest of the paintwork was rubbed back with a scotch pad to allow the new paint to key followed by a tac-clothing all over.

The pump was then masked up and given coats of Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer allowing a cure between coats and a good long cure after painting was complete.

The ABS system was loosely bolted together...



... to identify what was needed, allowing stainless bleed nipples, banjo bolts and copper washers to be ordered. Also, this allowed me to check hose routing to make sure nothing was fouling.

Next was the rear brake lever assembly, for which all of the bits were pulled together...



... these bits were disassembled and the old bits all laid out with replacement pieces added to match as needed the parts remaining were cleaned up, with the brake lever itself polished...



... the return stop and master cylinder plunger added, these will be adjusted on commissioning, and the bush lightly greased before these were offered up and bolted into place on the bike...



... and the operation checked and the return spring fitted.

It looked like the return stop was going to impact the footrest stop as part of it's operation, so a self-adhesive rubber stop was added at the point of impact...



... to protect the footrest stop and avoid the annoying impact noise.

With pretty much everything done and all the parts arrived, it was time to double check and get the assembly finalised.

The new stainless banjo bolts and bleed nipples were put in with appropriate copper washers...



... to replace the old weather beaten fixing and torqued up.

As with all the other systems with fluid in, this will be added during the commissioning and therefore bled through at that time.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Throttle Bodies
« Reply #44 on: October 11, 2018, 12:29:43 PM »
I guess the ability for the bike to have fuel and air mixture delivered to the inlet valves would be useful, and with the airbox in, the throttle bodies are next.

As everything is together in one lump at the moment it was just a case of breaking id down to see the condition and how big the job would be.

Everything looked OK, with the clips for the rubbers needing replacing and the throttle bodies caked in grime ...



... so cleaning is the main job really.

The work started at the bottom, so reassembly could take place on the bike, so inlet rubbers were cleaned up lovely.

Each of the seats for the inlet rubbers were cleaned up in turn with a scraper and some 600 grit wet and dry paper before the rubbers were bolted back on ...



... and clips applied.

Next the throttle bodies themselves were cleaned up with WD-40 and an old tooth brush (yes, it took as long as it sounds it might), before being slotted onto the rubbers and clamped down. These were accompanied by the injectors, mainly as I didn't want to lose them in the ever rising tide of bike parts! Quickly followed by the rubbers between the throttle bodies and plenum chamber ...



... aided into position with a smear of WD-40.

The injectors were removed and brought together with the fuel rail but, given the injectors are sensitive pieces of kit (and I know they work), I decided not to paint these. But I did strip and paint the fuel rail ...



... with the usual layers of Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer, and allowing to cure before adding the injectors, injector electrical connections and offering these up to the crankcase before the injectors were inserted and the fuel rail bolted into place ...



... and fuel pipes reconnected to both ends of the fuel rail.

The plenum chamber was cleaned up, clips for the joining rubbers added and internal faces smeared with WD-40. This allowed the fitting of the plenum chamber ...



... before tightening all the claps to secure, before the breather for the crankcase was attached.

With everything for the assembly back together, job done.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima: Footrests
« Reply #45 on: October 21, 2018, 06:17:00 AM »
I've been looking at the footrest brackets on the bike for a while now and then choosing to do something else. I think it's about time I got on with these.

So, as is traditional, all the components for each side were laid out to see what I had...



... with it being fairly clear the bolts and pins needed replacing, rear footrest holders needed repainting and all the other bits needed a good clean up.

Once the stainless steel replacement parts were ordered, the first job was to clean up the metal centres of each footrest to take it from the condition I found these in to a condition I was happy with, this required cleaning with WD-40, paper towel and a scraper before drying off and application of Autosol Metal Polish with wire wool. Following this a buffing wheel on a drill was used to finish up.

The rear footrest mounting brackets were stripped back with a wire wheel, to remove the rust, before layering up with Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel, Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer and being set aside to cure.

With everything cleaned, ordered parts arrived and the paintwork cured off, all the components were brought back together to double check fitment...



... before the old pins, bolts, washers, split pins and nuts were chucked into the recycling.

Starting on the left of the bike, the rear footrest mounts were bolted onto the bracket backplate to allow some minor adjustment ...



... before the rubber was popped over the core, the pin hole had a drill run through it (as it was a fraction tighter on the fit than I'd like)...



... the bearing faces on the mount were greased as was the pin.

The back washer was added to the core, the footrest was pushed into position and the pin slid in...



.. then washered and split pinned to secure it.

The front footrest was easier to fit, although quite fiddly, with the bearing faces and pin greased, footrest added and pinned.

The pin was retracted a little to allow the return spring to be fitted, the seat of which was also greased, the spacer and washer added and the assembly compressed...



... to allow the split pin to be added to secure it all.

From doing the left side first, I found it was a pain (especially with the rear footrest) to attach the rubber to the core before fitting, as you have to compress the rubber to get the pin in - this did cause me to slip and create a little paint touch-up work for me.

So, with the right side, the bare cores (without the rubbers) were fitted to the bike, for both front and rear...



... before the rubbers were added...



... to both footrests.

This turned out to be a much better way to fit the footrests and I'd recommend fitting them this way in the future!

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration: Undertray & Rear Mudguard
« Reply #46 on: October 21, 2018, 05:18:15 PM »
With the back end coming on nicely, I thought it would be time for the first of the bodywork to go back on.

So, starting with the rear mudguard everything was laid out replacement fastenings ordered and the plastic cleaned up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner, before the parts were pulled back together...



... and checked over to ensure I hadn't missed any damage.

Once I was happy, and after a cuppa, the mudguard was offered up and fitted...



... it's starting to look like a bike again now!

Then onto the undertray, once again everything was laid out with the effect on the damage from road crud and salt apparent ...



... but, to solve this, the fittings were stripped back with a wire wheel on a drill to remove the vast majority of the rot...



... with the remainder of the rot being treated with Kurust, to get into those bits a wire brush can't ...



... before a couple of coats of Hammerite Smooth Silver was used to protect these in future...



... with these left to cure off.

In the meantime, the undertray was cleaned up with Muc-Off and WD-40 before a proper clean with Muc-Off before this was offered up to the bike ...



... to ensure everything is where it needs to be (including the rubber stops on the rear of the gearbox).

The last piece of this rear-end black plastic is the lower section of the tail fairing ...



... this was cleaned up with Muc-Off and a rag, with the fixing bolt and captured nut being replaced with stainless steel upgrades and was offered up to the bike before the undertray was fixed in place and the lower section of the tail section secured in place ...



... to finish off the job.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration: Wiring Loom & Fusebox
« Reply #47 on: October 21, 2018, 05:26:09 PM »
So, as I've been adding things back to the frame, I've been adding in the wiring loom, so you will have seen this in pictures on previous posts, but I wanted to detail the main loom installation in 1 go here.

The harness was pulled out of the box and laid out...



... and given a once over to check for any damaging to the harness. The only damage was seen was the missing loom wrap on the section which gets the brunt of the road crud as it runs along the side of the undertray.

To start the re-build, the fuse box was cleaned up and the internals rearranged before being refitted into their original positions, starting with the cabelling for the alternator fed though before the internals were bolted in ...



... and fitted back into the bike and the wiring loom fed into the front of the frame...



... allowing the cables for the coil packs to be connected up straight away, followed by the power socket and the cover...



... which tidies that up.

The loom was fed through the front of the frame, with the rear section of the loom brought through above the airbox...



... allowing everything which had to go forward being slung over the handlebars before the plastic trim under the loom was added.

With the rear section of the loom now held on the bike, it allowed good access to the damaged section of the loom. All the loose wrap was removed and taken back to good material, which was held in place with electrical tape...



... and the exposed section wrapped with electrical wiring loom material to keep everything together and protect the cabelling ...



... and, of course, it looks a lot better.

At the front of the frame, the ignition control unit was added into the recess in the frame allowing this to be connected up.

The battery was added to the bike, with the screws and retaining plate getting a complete strip and re-paint due to the the corrosion seen on the parts...



... which, once cured were put in place to clamp down the battery.

The rear of the loom was run along the inside edge of the frame on the right hand side which will be tied into position once everything is in place, to allow of routing into the best position.

The rearward section of the harness was run to the rear mudguard and back through the lower portion of the tail fairing ...



... with the ABS control unit put in place and electrically attached...



... completing the main run of the wiring loom.

The remaining electrical connections will be dealt with in each of their respective sections.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration: Rear Indicators
« Reply #48 on: October 21, 2018, 05:32:34 PM »
With the lower part of the tail fairing in place, the indicators were the next job, so all the parts were, as usual, laid out to see what I had...



... so it looks like just a case of a tidy up and a check for operation .

The plastics were cleaned up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner, WD-40 for the more stubborn bits and final clean off with more Muc-Off...



... which were then bolted back into place on the bike...



... and the electrics run into the housings...



... to make sure the cable runs were good with no snagging.

Each of the indicators were checked for operation in turn (please forgive the pun!)...



... with no issues there.

The lenses were then reattached to the housings...



... completing the job.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

Offline Wollyjumperuk

  • Motobrick Curious
  • Posts: 43
BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration: Tail & Brake Light
« Reply #49 on: October 24, 2018, 03:23:40 PM »
With the indicators on and the electrics in place, it was time to finish off the rear end lighting with the combined brake and tail light.

Well, it didn't take long for all the pieces to be pulled together ...



... which wasn't a difficult job, to be honest.

The back of the unit was cleaned up, with a dry rag, before both the brake light and tail light sections were tested for operation ...



... and found to be fine.

The unit was wired into the rear of the bike and the wiring loom aligned to allow the rear light to be refitted...



... before the rear lens was cleaned with Muc-Off to finish the job.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com
  • Fareham, Hampshire, UK
  • BMW K75RT Ultima
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects - please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com

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